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urzung khan
http://www.dawn.com/2007/04/17/top9.htm

W.Z. Ahmed passes away

By Shoaib Ahmed


LAHORE, April 16: W.Z. Ahmed, 91, one of the most outstanding film directors of the subcontinent, passed away at a local hospital late on Sunday night. He was suffering from an infection of the lung. He was laid to rest at the Bagh-i-Rehmat graveyard on Monday afternoon.

After coming up with a series of films in only five years, Wahiduddin Ziauddin Ahmed, was not as prolific as some of his successors in the film industry. He directed-produced five films before the partition of the sub-continent: ‘Aik Raat’, ‘Mann Ki Jeet’, ‘Prem Sangeet’, ‘Prithaviraj- Samyukta’ and ‘Mira Bai’ all released between 1942 and 1947.

After partition, he made just two films ‘Roohi’ and ‘Wada’, while a third one, ‘Wafa Ki Ada’, remained incomplete. The country’s environment was obviously not suited to his brand of cinema and his creation as one of his masterpieces, ‘Roohi’, has the distinction of being the first-ever film to be banned in Pakistan. The government said the film generated ‘class hatred’, and if that was not bad enough, portrayed a ‘rich married woman having an affair with a young, unmarried man’.

The ban was later revoked and ‘Roohi’ was released in 1954. The same year W.Z. Ahmed was at the forefront of the campaign against the screening of Indian films. The protest was known as ‘Jaal agitation’ after a Dev Anand-starrer of the same name that had been imported out of East Pakistan’s quota a limited number of Indian films were allowed into Pakistan until then and then brought over to West Pakistan. The protest led to the arrest of Mr Ahmed and many others in Lahore.

Mr Ahmed owned the Shalimar Pictures in Pune and another studio in Madras before 1947. Some very famous writers and lyricists worked for Shalimar, including Josh Malihabadi, Krisan Chander, Ramanand Sagar, Akhtar-ul-Iman and Sagar Nizami. He established the W.Z. Studio at Wahdat Road in Lahore after some years after partition. He spent many years of his life pursuing the ideal of a filmmakers’ cooperative.

Sanaullah Khan Gandapur, who worked as an assistant to W.Z. Ahmed, remembers his guru as an excellent story-writer and a director with a vision and skill to mould actors according to his requirement. He was a man of diversified interests and immense knowledge, Mr Gandapur says.

Mr Ahmed was born in Gujarat, India, in 1916 where his father was a senior police officer. He is said to have been moved into entering filmdom by K.L. Sehgal’s Dev Das. It is said Mr Ahmed went to watch Dev Das and was so disappointed with the production that he decided to direct films himself.

He married twice. His first wife was a daughter of Sir Ghulam Husain Hidayatullah. Later on, he married Shahida, who acted in films under the adopted name of Neena. She died a few years ago. Mr Ahmed had a son, Fariduddin Ahmed, and a daughter, Afia Rabbani.

Fariduddin Ahmed, well known as Farid Ahmed, was a talented filmmaker who married television and stage actor and producer, Samina Ahmed. Farid died in 1993.
......................................................................................................................................................................

May God rest his soul in peace.

Urzung Khan
Inaam
Sad news!!!
I saw his film 'Waada', it is a classic movie. He was great director indeed.
May Allah rest his soul in peace. Aameen.
surhall
QUOTE(Inaam @ Apr 18 2007, 09:08 PM) *

Sad news!!!
I saw his film 'Waada', it is a classic movie. He was great director indeed.
May Allah rest his soul in peace. Aameen.



VERY SAD NEWS ALLAH REST HIS SOUL IN PEACE. KUDHA.

I HAVE ONE OF BEST WRITER LATE JIGER MUEADABADI WORD WHAT HE WAS SAY>>>>
Josh is reputed to have had a masterful command over Urdu language and was quite strict about respecting the grammar and rules of the language. The first collection of his poetry was published in 1921. The collection of his poetries include Shola-o-Shabnam, Junoon-o-Hikmat, Fikr-o-Nishaat, Sunbal-o-Salaasal, Harf-o-Hikaayat, Sarod-o-Kharosh (all Urdu titles). On the advice of film director W.Z.Ahmed, he also wrote songs for Shalimar Pictures. During this time, he was staying in Pune. His autobiography is titled Yaadon ki Baarat.

SOON I U/L NEWS ABOUT THIS.

DHALL
Harjinder
Khan saheb
I am saddened by the passing of Mr W.Z.Ahmed. Again jaissey waqt guzarata ja raha hai hamare 1947 sey pehle waaley log sabh Khuda ko pyarey hotey ja rahe hain. Woh tehzeeb aur zuban jo ham sabh ki sanjhi malqiat thi ab kaheen gayeb see hee ho gayee lagti hai.We Punjabees are all products of the great upheaval of partition. This creation of artificial new borders may have helped some great causes but it did deprive people llike me of the tehzeeb and language that was prevalent before this bifurcation. Ahmed saheb ki to mujhe jankari naheen thee lekin un ka guzar jaana wohee khyalaat phir dil dimag mein ley aaya hai jin sey ab tak main uljhta aya hoon.Shayed Ibn Insha saheb ne 'Urdu ki Maut' mein un logon ki hasraton ke marney ka ziqqar kiya tha jo partition sey ya to dab hee gayeen ya bahut bedardi sey katal kar dee gayee.May God grant peace to Ahmed saheb. Harjinder
noorie
QUOTE(urzung khan @ Apr 18 2007, 09:18 AM) *

http://www.dawn.com/2007/04/17/top9.htm

W.Z. Ahmed passes away

By Shoaib Ahmed


LAHORE, April 16: W.Z. Ahmed, 91, one of the most outstanding film directors of the subcontinent, passed away at a local hospital late on Sunday night. He was suffering from an infection of the lung. He was laid to rest at the Bagh-i-Rehmat graveyard on Monday afternoon.

After coming up with a series of films in only five years, Wahiduddin Ziauddin Ahmed, was not as prolific as some of his successors in the film industry. He directed-produced five films before the partition of the sub-continent: ‘Aik Raat’, ‘Mann Ki Jeet’, ‘Prem Sangeet’, ‘Prithaviraj- Samyukta’ and ‘Mira Bai’ all released between 1942 and 1947.

After partition, he made just two films ‘Roohi’ and ‘Wada’, while a third one, ‘Wafa Ki Ada’, remained incomplete. The country’s environment was obviously not suited to his brand of cinema and his creation as one of his masterpieces, ‘Roohi’, has the distinction of being the first-ever film to be banned in Pakistan. The government said the film generated ‘class hatred’, and if that was not bad enough, portrayed a ‘rich married woman having an affair with a young, unmarried man’.

The ban was later revoked and ‘Roohi’ was released in 1954. The same year W.Z. Ahmed was at the forefront of the campaign against the screening of Indian films. The protest was known as ‘Jaal agitation’ after a Dev Anand-starrer of the same name that had been imported out of East Pakistan’s quota a limited number of Indian films were allowed into Pakistan until then and then brought over to West Pakistan. The protest led to the arrest of Mr Ahmed and many others in Lahore.

Mr Ahmed owned the Shalimar Pictures in Pune and another studio in Madras before 1947. Some very famous writers and lyricists worked for Shalimar, including Josh Malihabadi, Krisan Chander, Ramanand Sagar, Akhtar-ul-Iman and Sagar Nizami. He established the W.Z. Studio at Wahdat Road in Lahore after some years after partition. He spent many years of his life pursuing the ideal of a filmmakers’ cooperative.

Sanaullah Khan Gandapur, who worked as an assistant to W.Z. Ahmed, remembers his guru as an excellent story-writer and a director with a vision and skill to mould actors according to his requirement. He was a man of diversified interests and immense knowledge, Mr Gandapur says.

Mr Ahmed was born in Gujarat, India, in 1916 where his father was a senior police officer. He is said to have been moved into entering filmdom by K.L. Sehgal’s Dev Das. It is said Mr Ahmed went to watch Dev Das and was so disappointed with the production that he decided to direct films himself.

He married twice. His first wife was a daughter of Sir Ghulam Husain Hidayatullah. Later on, he married Shahida, who acted in films under the adopted name of Neena. She died a few years ago. Mr Ahmed had a son, Fariduddin Ahmed, and a daughter, Afia Rabbani.

Fariduddin Ahmed, well known as Farid Ahmed, was a talented filmmaker who married television and stage actor and producer, Samina Ahmed. Farid died in 1993.



Culture can't be insular, I wish ppl wud realise that. sad.gif

Noorie


Ummer
QUOTE(noorie @ Apr 19 2007, 07:58 AM) *

QUOTE(urzung khan @ Apr 18 2007, 09:18 AM) *

http://www.dawn.com/2007/04/17/top9.htm

W.Z. Ahmed passes away

By Shoaib Ahmed


LAHORE, April 16: W.Z. Ahmed, 91, one of the most outstanding film directors of the subcontinent, passed away at a local hospital late on Sunday night. He was suffering from an infection of the lung. He was laid to rest at the Bagh-i-Rehmat graveyard on Monday afternoon.

After coming up with a series of films in only five years, Wahiduddin Ziauddin Ahmed, was not as prolific as some of his successors in the film industry. He directed-produced five films before the partition of the sub-continent: ‘Aik Raat’, ‘Mann Ki Jeet’, ‘Prem Sangeet’, ‘Prithaviraj- Samyukta’ and ‘Mira Bai’ all released between 1942 and 1947.

After partition, he made just two films ‘Roohi’ and ‘Wada’, while a third one, ‘Wafa Ki Ada’, remained incomplete. The country’s environment was obviously not suited to his brand of cinema and his creation as one of his masterpieces, ‘Roohi’, has the distinction of being the first-ever film to be banned in Pakistan. The government said the film generated ‘class hatred’, and if that was not bad enough, portrayed a ‘rich married woman having an affair with a young, unmarried man’.

The ban was later revoked and ‘Roohi’ was released in 1954. The same year W.Z. Ahmed was at the forefront of the campaign against the screening of Indian films. The protest was known as ‘Jaal agitation’ after a Dev Anand-starrer of the same name that had been imported out of East Pakistan’s quota a limited number of Indian films were allowed into Pakistan until then and then brought over to West Pakistan. The protest led to the arrest of Mr Ahmed and many others in Lahore.

Mr Ahmed owned the Shalimar Pictures in Pune and another studio in Madras before 1947. Some very famous writers and lyricists worked for Shalimar, including Josh Malihabadi, Krisan Chander, Ramanand Sagar, Akhtar-ul-Iman and Sagar Nizami. He established the W.Z. Studio at Wahdat Road in Lahore after some years after partition. He spent many years of his life pursuing the ideal of a filmmakers’ cooperative.

Sanaullah Khan Gandapur, who worked as an assistant to W.Z. Ahmed, remembers his guru as an excellent story-writer and a director with a vision and skill to mould actors according to his requirement. He was a man of diversified interests and immense knowledge, Mr Gandapur says.

Mr Ahmed was born in Gujarat, India, in 1916 where his father was a senior police officer. He is said to have been moved into entering filmdom by K.L. Sehgal’s Dev Das. It is said Mr Ahmed went to watch Dev Das and was so disappointed with the production that he decided to direct films himself.

He married twice. His first wife was a daughter of Sir Ghulam Husain Hidayatullah. Later on, he married Shahida, who acted in films under the adopted name of Neena. She died a few years ago. Mr Ahmed had a son, Fariduddin Ahmed, and a daughter, Afia Rabbani.

Fariduddin Ahmed, well known as Farid Ahmed, was a talented filmmaker who married television and stage actor and producer, Samina Ahmed. Farid died in 1993.



Culture can't be insular, I wish ppl wud realise that. sad.gif

Noorie


Noorie,

Not to defend W.Z. Ahmed... but at that time a temporary ban on Indian films was necessary, otherwise Pakistani film industry would never have developed as Indian film industry was well established and Indian films were generally superior in quality (technically) to Pakistani films.

In my opinion after Pakistani film industry got established, they should have allowed open exhibition of Indian films to reduce plagiarism in Pakistani films + offering some stiff competition. Indian films were not completely banned in Pakistan till 1965, they were shown in limited numbers though.

Completely banning Indian Films also had reverse effect on Pakistani Films as the competition was over and the quality of Pakistani films started to decline.

Ummer
QUOTE(Harjinder @ Apr 18 2007, 08:03 PM) *

Khan saheb
I am saddened by the passing of Mr W.Z.Ahmed. Again jaissey waqt guzarata ja raha hai hamare 1947 sey pehle waaley log sabh Khuda ko pyarey hotey ja rahe hain. Woh tehzeeb aur zuban jo ham sabh ki sanjhi malqiat thi ab kaheen gayeb see hee ho gayee lagti hai.We Punjabees are all products of the great upheaval of partition. This creation of artificial new borders may have helped some great causes but it did deprive people llike me of the tehzeeb and language that was prevalent before this bifurcation. Ahmed saheb ki to mujhe jankari naheen thee lekin un ka guzar jaana wohee khyalaat phir dil dimag mein ley aaya hai jin sey ab tak main uljhta aya hoon.Shayed Ibn Insha saheb ne 'Urdu ki Maut' mein un logon ki hasraton ke marney ka ziqqar kiya tha jo partition sey ya to dab hee gayeen ya bahut bedardi sey katal kar dee gayee.May God grant peace to Ahmed saheb. Harjinder


Saadat Hassan Manto has written a detailed sketch on W.Z. Ahmed and his wife Mysterious Neena... you can read the english translation in "Stars from Another Sky" Filmworld of the 40s.
noorie
QUOTE(Ummer @ Apr 20 2007, 08:31 AM) *

QUOTE(noorie @ Apr 19 2007, 07:58 AM) *

QUOTE(urzung khan @ Apr 18 2007, 09:18 AM) *

http://www.dawn.com/2007/04/17/top9.htm

W.Z. Ahmed passes away

By Shoaib Ahmed


LAHORE, April 16: W.Z. Ahmed, 91, one of the most outstanding film directors of the subcontinent, passed away at a local hospital late on Sunday night. He was suffering from an infection of the lung. He was laid to rest at the Bagh-i-Rehmat graveyard on Monday afternoon.

After coming up with a series of films in only five years, Wahiduddin Ziauddin Ahmed, was not as prolific as some of his successors in the film industry. He directed-produced five films before the partition of the sub-continent: ‘Aik Raat’, ‘Mann Ki Jeet’, ‘Prem Sangeet’, ‘Prithaviraj- Samyukta’ and ‘Mira Bai’ all released between 1942 and 1947.

After partition, he made just two films ‘Roohi’ and ‘Wada’, while a third one, ‘Wafa Ki Ada’, remained incomplete. The country’s environment was obviously not suited to his brand of cinema and his creation as one of his masterpieces, ‘Roohi’, has the distinction of being the first-ever film to be banned in Pakistan. The government said the film generated ‘class hatred’, and if that was not bad enough, portrayed a ‘rich married woman having an affair with a young, unmarried man’.

The ban was later revoked and ‘Roohi’ was released in 1954. The same year W.Z. Ahmed was at the forefront of the campaign against the screening of Indian films. The protest was known as ‘Jaal agitation’ after a Dev Anand-starrer of the same name that had been imported out of East Pakistan’s quota a limited number of Indian films were allowed into Pakistan until then and then brought over to West Pakistan. The protest led to the arrest of Mr Ahmed and many others in Lahore.

Mr Ahmed owned the Shalimar Pictures in Pune and another studio in Madras before 1947. Some very famous writers and lyricists worked for Shalimar, including Josh Malihabadi, Krisan Chander, Ramanand Sagar, Akhtar-ul-Iman and Sagar Nizami. He established the W.Z. Studio at Wahdat Road in Lahore after some years after partition. He spent many years of his life pursuing the ideal of a filmmakers’ cooperative.

Sanaullah Khan Gandapur, who worked as an assistant to W.Z. Ahmed, remembers his guru as an excellent story-writer and a director with a vision and skill to mould actors according to his requirement. He was a man of diversified interests and immense knowledge, Mr Gandapur says.

Mr Ahmed was born in Gujarat, India, in 1916 where his father was a senior police officer. He is said to have been moved into entering filmdom by K.L. Sehgal’s Dev Das. It is said Mr Ahmed went to watch Dev Das and was so disappointed with the production that he decided to direct films himself.

He married twice. His first wife was a daughter of Sir Ghulam Husain Hidayatullah. Later on, he married Shahida, who acted in films under the adopted name of Neena. She died a few years ago. Mr Ahmed had a son, Fariduddin Ahmed, and a daughter, Afia Rabbani.

Fariduddin Ahmed, well known as Farid Ahmed, was a talented filmmaker who married television and stage actor and producer, Samina Ahmed. Farid died in 1993.



Culture can't be insular, I wish ppl wud realise that. sad.gif

Noorie


Noorie,

Not to defend W.Z. Ahmed... but at that time a temporary ban on Indian films was necessary, otherwise Pakistani film industry would never have developed as Indian film industry was well established and Indian films were generally superior in quality (technically) to Pakistani films.

In my opinion after Pakistani film industry got established, they should have allowed open exhibition of Indian films to reduce plagiarism in Pakistani films + offering some stiff competition. Indian films were not completely banned in Pakistan till 1965, they were shown in limited numbers though.

Completely banning Indian Films also had reverse effect on Pakistani Films as the competition was over and the quality of Pakistani films started to decline.


Ummar, it seems the ban wasn't really effective; the flourishing pirated market in VCD's / DVD's of old and new Hindi movies in Pakistan is proof of that, isn't it? And now there's the cable / satellite TV invasion too.

Perhaps the time has come 2 open up the cultural border at least. Your comments? smile.gif

Noorie
Ummer
QUOTE(noorie @ Apr 20 2007, 04:16 PM) *

QUOTE(Ummer @ Apr 20 2007, 08:31 AM) *

QUOTE(noorie @ Apr 19 2007, 07:58 AM) *

QUOTE(urzung khan @ Apr 18 2007, 09:18 AM) *

http://www.dawn.com/2007/04/17/top9.htm

W.Z. Ahmed passes away

By Shoaib Ahmed


LAHORE, April 16: W.Z. Ahmed, 91, one of the most outstanding film directors of the subcontinent, passed away at a local hospital late on Sunday night. He was suffering from an infection of the lung. He was laid to rest at the Bagh-i-Rehmat graveyard on Monday afternoon.

After coming up with a series of films in only five years, Wahiduddin Ziauddin Ahmed, was not as prolific as some of his successors in the film industry. He directed-produced five films before the partition of the sub-continent: ‘Aik Raat’, ‘Mann Ki Jeet’, ‘Prem Sangeet’, ‘Prithaviraj- Samyukta’ and ‘Mira Bai’ all released between 1942 and 1947.

After partition, he made just two films ‘Roohi’ and ‘Wada’, while a third one, ‘Wafa Ki Ada’, remained incomplete. The country’s environment was obviously not suited to his brand of cinema and his creation as one of his masterpieces, ‘Roohi’, has the distinction of being the first-ever film to be banned in Pakistan. The government said the film generated ‘class hatred’, and if that was not bad enough, portrayed a ‘rich married woman having an affair with a young, unmarried man’.

The ban was later revoked and ‘Roohi’ was released in 1954. The same year W.Z. Ahmed was at the forefront of the campaign against the screening of Indian films. The protest was known as ‘Jaal agitation’ after a Dev Anand-starrer of the same name that had been imported out of East Pakistan’s quota a limited number of Indian films were allowed into Pakistan until then and then brought over to West Pakistan. The protest led to the arrest of Mr Ahmed and many others in Lahore.

Mr Ahmed owned the Shalimar Pictures in Pune and another studio in Madras before 1947. Some very famous writers and lyricists worked for Shalimar, including Josh Malihabadi, Krisan Chander, Ramanand Sagar, Akhtar-ul-Iman and Sagar Nizami. He established the W.Z. Studio at Wahdat Road in Lahore after some years after partition. He spent many years of his life pursuing the ideal of a filmmakers’ cooperative.

Sanaullah Khan Gandapur, who worked as an assistant to W.Z. Ahmed, remembers his guru as an excellent story-writer and a director with a vision and skill to mould actors according to his requirement. He was a man of diversified interests and immense knowledge, Mr Gandapur says.

Mr Ahmed was born in Gujarat, India, in 1916 where his father was a senior police officer. He is said to have been moved into entering filmdom by K.L. Sehgal’s Dev Das. It is said Mr Ahmed went to watch Dev Das and was so disappointed with the production that he decided to direct films himself.

He married twice. His first wife was a daughter of Sir Ghulam Husain Hidayatullah. Later on, he married Shahida, who acted in films under the adopted name of Neena. She died a few years ago. Mr Ahmed had a son, Fariduddin Ahmed, and a daughter, Afia Rabbani.

Fariduddin Ahmed, well known as Farid Ahmed, was a talented filmmaker who married television and stage actor and producer, Samina Ahmed. Farid died in 1993.



Culture can't be insular, I wish ppl wud realise that. sad.gif

Noorie


Noorie,

Not to defend W.Z. Ahmed... but at that time a temporary ban on Indian films was necessary, otherwise Pakistani film industry would never have developed as Indian film industry was well established and Indian films were generally superior in quality (technically) to Pakistani films.

In my opinion after Pakistani film industry got established, they should have allowed open exhibition of Indian films to reduce plagiarism in Pakistani films + offering some stiff competition. Indian films were not completely banned in Pakistan till 1965, they were shown in limited numbers though.

Completely banning Indian Films also had reverse effect on Pakistani Films as the competition was over and the quality of Pakistani films started to decline.


Ummar, it seems the ban wasn't really effective; the flourishing pirated market in VCD's / DVD's of old and new Hindi movies in Pakistan is proof of that, isn't it? And now there's the cable / satellite TV invasion too.

Perhaps the time has come 2 open up the cultural border at least. Your comments? smile.gif

Noorie



Ofcourse it is time to open the cultural border... That is what I said that the complete ban of Indian films had reverse effect on Pakistani films too.

But when these artistes demonstrated against the illegal import of Indian films (1954), there were no VCDs and VCRs at that time. They were only trying to secure and save the newly established film industry when 80/90% of films were flopping because they couldn't compete with the flashy bollywood productions.

In my opinion after Pakistani film industry got established in the 60s, they should have lifted the ban and allowed open competition with Indian films.
balajigade
QUOTE
Ofcourse it is time to open the cultural border... That is what I said that the complete ban of Indian films had reverse effect on Pakistani films too.

But when these artistes demonstrated against the illegal import of Indian films (1954), there were no VCDs and VCRs at that time. They were only trying to secure and save the newly established film industry when 80/90% of films were flopping because they couldn't compete with the flashy bollywood productions.

In my opinion after Pakistani film industry got established in the 60s, they should have lifted the ban and allowed open competition with Indian films.


First of all, are we able to see Pak films in India?
I collected a no. of old Hindi movie songs smuggled from Pak, when I was working in Rajasthan.
About 15 years back when the Star TV network started, PTV 2 was shown in many cities which used to air very good quality of serials and excellent literary programs. Even in the southern part of the country where I'm located the video libraries used to have a good circulation of Pak TV serials and mushairas. Instead of spreading fanaticism, the Govts. should have promoted exchange of culture, music & literary activities which I'm sure you all will agree, have no boundaries.

--Balaji
Ummer
Yeah I agree with you, music, films, and other performing arts shouldn't be banned... The banning of Indian films didn't have any effect on the Pakistani audiences as Indian films are available in Pakistan, the day they are released in India biggrin.gif biggrin.gif Therefore, holding a ban on Indian films is completely ridiculous.
Inaam
And what do you think about the release of Pak films in India?

balajigade
QUOTE(Inaam @ Apr 22 2007, 02:21 PM) *

And what do you think about the release of Pak films in India?


Definitely yes. Watching the movies and listening to music is the most powerful and the cheapest way of knowing each other's culture...at least for the viewer. And I remember in late 50's and early 60's Radio Karachi used to broadcast Hindi & Paki songs alternately at 0600 in the morning, but I don't know whether any such gesture was extended from the Indian counterpart.

--Balaji
Ummer
QUOTE(Inaam @ Apr 22 2007, 03:51 AM) *

And what do you think about the release of Pak films in India?


Inaam,

Who will watch the latest Pakistani Urdu films anywayz? They have such bad quality... that even Pakistani audiences dont watch them anymore. ninja.gif And India has its own largest film industry in the world. And all south asian countries films follow the same pattern.. songs, dances etc. Pakistani cinema is not different than Indian cinema like the cinema of Iran etc.

I think... Indian Hindi movies should be shown in Pakistan cinemas, and Pakistan should improve the quality of its Punjabi films which has enormous potential in North India and can be shown in Indian Punjab, Haryana etc. Raj Babbar said there is a great potential for Punjabi films if punjabis on both sides launch co-productions. It will be a win-win situation for both Pakistan and India.
Harjinder
QUOTE(Ummer @ Apr 19 2007, 10:03 PM) *

QUOTE(Harjinder @ Apr 18 2007, 08:03 PM) *

Khan saheb
I am saddened by the passing of Mr W.Z.Ahmed. Again jaissey waqt guzarata ja raha hai hamare 1947 sey pehle waaley log sabh Khuda ko pyarey hotey ja rahe hain. Woh tehzeeb aur zuban jo ham sabh ki sanjhi malqiat thi ab kaheen gayeb see hee ho gayee lagti hai.We Punjabees are all products of the great upheaval of partition. This creation of artificial new borders may have helped some great causes but it did deprive people llike me of the tehzeeb and language that was prevalent before this bifurcation. Ahmed saheb ki to mujhe jankari naheen thee lekin un ka guzar jaana wohee khyalaat phir dil dimag mein ley aaya hai jin sey ab tak main uljhta aya hoon.Shayed Ibn Insha saheb ne 'Urdu ki Maut' mein un logon ki hasraton ke marney ka ziqqar kiya tha jo partition sey ya to dab hee gayeen ya bahut bedardi sey katal kar dee gayee.May God grant peace to Ahmed saheb. Harjinder


Saadat Hassan Manto has written a detailed sketch on W.Z. Ahmed and his wife Mysterious Neena... you can read the english translation in "Stars from Another Sky" Filmworld of the 40s.

Ummer saheb
Thanks for your mention of Manto's story on Ahmed saheb and his wife Neena. I think I can read Manto in Urdu too. I'll look for this story in both languages.Thanks.Harjinder
Ummer
Here is the picture of W.Z Ahmed and his wife Neena. Befoe partition Neena worked in Ek Raat (1942), Prem Sangeet (1943), Man ki Jeet(1944) , Meera Bai (1947) and Prithviraj Samyukta (1946). Among them the most famous were Man ki Jeet and Meera Bai. Man ki jeet was the first indian adaptation of Thomas Hardy's Tess of the d'Urbervilles. Man ki jeet songs were penned by the renowned revolutionary Indian poet Josh Malihabadi. The film had many touching songs including Man Kahey Ghabraey, Pardesi kiyoun yaad aata hai, besides the most titillating song of its time Mera juban ka dekho ubhar (sung by Zohra Bai Ambala Walie). One film song was even recorded in the voice of Neena.

After partition Neena worked in only one Pakistani film Akeli (1951).
shoom
QUOTE(Ummer @ Apr 30 2007, 12:52 AM) *

Here is the picture of W.Z Ahmed and his wife Neena. Befoe partition Neena worked in Ek Raat (1942), Prem Sangeet (1943), Man ki Jeet(1944) , Meera Bai (1947) and Prithviraj Samyukta (1946). Among them the most famous were Man ki Jeet and Meera Bai. Man ki jeet was the first indian adaptation of Thomas Hardy's Tess of the d'Urbervilles. Man ki jeet songs were penned by the renowned revolutionary Indian poet Josh Malihabadi. The film had many touching songs including Man Kahey Ghabraey, Pardesi kiyoun yaad aata hai, besides the most titillating song of its time Mera juban ka dekho ubhar (sung by Zohra Bai Ambala Walie). One film song was even recorded in the voice of Neena.

After partition Neena worked in only one Pakistani film Akeli (1951).


Man Ki Jeet (Tan Ki Haar)


1. ai chaand na itraanaa
2. pardesi kyon yaad aataa hai
3. man kaahe ghabraye
4. nagri meri kab tak yoonhi barbaab rahe gi
5. ai chaand umeedom ko meri shama dikha de
6. mere jobna ka dekho ubhaar/ Zohra
7. chhip chip kar mat dekho/ Shanta Thakkar and Bharat Vyaas

Lyricist for 1 to 6 was Josh Malihabadi. # 7 was written by Bharat Vyas.
Songs # 4 and 5 may be considered as two parts of the same song although they they appear on different record numbers.

Would you please point out which song was recorded in the voice of Neena ??

-Hashmat
Ummer
QUOTE(shoom @ Apr 29 2007, 07:06 PM) *

QUOTE(Ummer @ Apr 30 2007, 12:52 AM) *

Here is the picture of W.Z Ahmed and his wife Neena. Befoe partition Neena worked in Ek Raat (1942), Prem Sangeet (1943), Man ki Jeet(1944) , Meera Bai (1947) and Prithviraj Samyukta (1946). Among them the most famous were Man ki Jeet and Meera Bai. Man ki jeet was the first indian adaptation of Thomas Hardy's Tess of the d'Urbervilles. Man ki jeet songs were penned by the renowned revolutionary Indian poet Josh Malihabadi. The film had many touching songs including Man Kahey Ghabraey, Pardesi kiyoun yaad aata hai, besides the most titillating song of its time Mera juban ka dekho ubhar (sung by Zohra Bai Ambala Walie). One film song was even recorded in the voice of Neena.

After partition Neena worked in only one Pakistani film Akeli (1951).


Man Ki Jeet (Tan Ki Haar)


1. ai chaand na itraanaa
2. pardesi kyon yaad aataa hai
3. man kaahe ghabraye
4. nagri meri kab tak yoonhi barbaab rahe gi
5. ai chaand umeedom ko meri shama dikha de
6. mere jobna ka dekho ubhaar/ Zohra
7. chhip chip kar mat dekho/ Shanta Thakkar and Bharat Vyaas

Lyricist for 1 to 6 was Josh Malihabadi. # 7 was written by Bharat Vyas.
Songs # 4 and 5 may be considered as two parts of the same song although they they appear on different record numbers.

Would you please point out which song was recorded in the voice of Neena ??

-Hashmat



The songs which were recorded in the voice of Sitara were also recorded in the voice of Neena, although Neena versions are very rare and are not available commercially. I got this info from RMIM

"Its a fact that her producer director husband WZ Ahmed recorded 4
songs of Man KI Jeet in the voice of Neena also apart from Sitara and
the records were unavailable commercially,I happened to listen all of
them with one of the nobles of Hyderabad who had those in his
collection. " Kamalakar Pasupuleti.


Harjinder
Khan Saheb
Since my knowledge of Urdu and Islamic Culture leaves a lot to be desired I am requesting you and other knowledgeable people to occasionally help me in this regard. Right now I have some (movie?) names that I would like to know more about. These are 'Lalla Rukh' 'Gul E Bakawali' and 'Youssef Zuleikha'.The last one I do have some knowledge of but the first two I would like to know meaning of the words or their story ( If nothing else, a little glimpse or synopsis of the movie plot.) Harjinder
Harjinder
Sahebaan
I guess I better give up. No one is answering. Harjinder
Inaam
I just saw this Harjindar ji, here is the meaning of the words/film names:

Lala Rukh = Tulip-cheeked (beloved; sweetheart)

Gul-e-Bakawali = A species of white fragrant flower

Inaam



Harjinder
QUOTE(Inaam @ Jun 8 2007, 02:11 PM) *

I just saw this Harjindar ji, here is the meaning of the words/film names:

Lala Rukh = Tulip-cheeked (beloved; sweetheart)

Gul-e-Bakawali = A species of white fragrant flower

Inaam

Inaam saheb
Thanks for the information.We all have to take care of day to day needs and be away from our hobbies and diversions May be I was a little impatient for the answers. Thanks anyway.Harjinder
noorie
QUOTE(Harjinder @ May 18 2007, 02:25 AM) *

Khan Saheb
Since my knowledge of Urdu and Islamic Culture leaves a lot to be desired I am requesting you and other knowledgeable people to occasionally help me in this regard. Right now I have some (movie?) names that I would like to know more about. These are 'Lalla Rukh' 'Gul E Bakawali' and 'Youssef Zuleikha'.The last one I do have some knowledge of but the first two I would like to know meaning of the words or their story ( If nothing else, a little glimpse or synopsis of the movie plot.) Harjinder


Gul-E-Bakawali is the story of Prince Taj-Ul-Muluk and the fairy Princess Bakawali.

Regarding Lalla Rukh perhaps this site may help you.
smile.gif

Lalla Rookh

Click to view attachment

Noorie
Harjinder
Noorie Ji
I had not checked this thread for a while. thanks for your input. I think you have provided me with a treasure of knowledge about Urdu literature. Harjinder
noorie
QUOTE(Harjinder @ Jul 7 2007, 01:14 AM) *




Noorie Ji

I had not checked this thread for a while. thanks for your input. I think you have provided me with a treasure of knowledge about Urdu literature. Harjinder




That's alright Harjinder ji; I am glad to be of any help. Please call me Noorie. smile.gif

Noorie
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