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swarapriya
Chaudhvin ka Chand (1960) - Post 1 (Songs)

This and the next post contains all the songs from the film. I am also including in this post some of the version songs sung by Sonu Nigam.

Here are the songs...
swarapriya
Chaudhvin ka Chand (1960) - Post 2 (Songs)

Here are the rest of the songs from this beautiful album...
swarapriya
Instrumentals of Some Songs from "Chaudhvin ka Chand (1960)" - Post 3

The following instrumentals of some of the popular songs from this film are all from various CD collections. Here are these...
swarapriya
Instrumentals of Some Songs from "Chaudhvin ka Chand (1960)" - Post 4

In this final post, the following instrumentals of some of the popular songs from this film are all derived from videos. Here are they...
swarapriya
(Anand Bakshi) Adhi Raat ke Baad (1965)

Ashok Kumar returns once again playing “Mr. X” in this film. “Mr. X” was made in 1957. This film came eight years after that movie. With not much of story, poor screenplay, ineffective special effects, and lack luster execution plagued the entire movie. In the end it turned out to be dull and a drag. Even some good songs composed by Chitraguptji did not help the situation.

Here are the songs from this album…
swarapriya
(Hasrat Jaipuri) Shree 420 (1955)

Songs from this popular album were recently uploaded in this very thread. They are available starting at the following location...

http://www.hamaraforums.com/index.php?show...4658&st=601

swarapriya
(Javed Akhtar) King Uncle (1993)

This film is an Indianized version of one of the longest running Broadway musical hit shows “Annie”. It was also made into a movie in Hollywood in 1982. The film was directed by the famous John Huston. Oscar winner Albert Finney headed the cast of the film. In spite of the big budget, the movie barely made back its invested money.

The Hindi version was directed by Rakesh Roshan. Originally the title role was offered to Amitabh Bachchan. This was during his lean phase. Bachchan decided not to accept the offer. Eventually Jackie Shroff was cast in the title role. The up and coming Shah Rukh Khan had a supporting role.

The movie belonged to a little girl who was called “Munna” in the movie. Pooja Ruparel, who was introduced in this film who played Munna, literally stole the show from the veterans. She was disarmingly charming and her presence brightened an otherwise ordinary film.

I am uploading songs from this film in two back-to-back posts. Here is the first set…
swarapriya
Concluding Songs from "King Uncle (1993)"...

Here are the rest of the songs from this album...



swarapriya
(Majrooh) Paying Guest (1957)

Here is a blithely Nutan paired opposite a buoyant Dev and when mingled with some breezy music by Burmanda for the songs written by magnificent Majrooh Saab the result is a playful ride called "Paying Guest". This movie has no pretensions to be anything else but to entertain. It does so superbly.

I have several favorite songs from this album. Among them are Lata's "Chaand Phir Nikla", Kishoreda's both solos, and both duets. My personal favorite is the duet "O Nigaahen Mastaana" where Asha is just humming along to the crooning of Kishore. It is an absolute charmer. This album is al out and out winner...

I am uploading these songs in two back-to-back posts. The first post contains all songs from the film. This includes the song “Gaye Ghabraake Mil” by Geetaji. This song was not included in the film. It is from an audio from You Tube that was uploaded by Parag Sankla. The song was contributed by Romesh Vora. Thanks Romesh and Parag for the song…

The second post contains several instrumentals of some of the popular songs from the film. It also contains a version song of “Chaand Phir Nikla”. I am also including here a shorter version of “Chhod Do Aanchal” with an introduction by Majrooh Saab.

Here is the first set of songs...
swarapriya
Concluding Songs from "Paying Guest (1957)"...

Here are some specials and instrumentals of some of the popular songs from the film...
swarapriya
(Rajinder Krishan) Mastana (1954)

Here is another Madan Mohanji's album minus Lataji...


swarapriya
(Shailendra) Jagte Raho (1956)

“Jagte Raho” is one of the brilliant movies ever to adorn the Indian cinema. It probably ranks high up there with Guru Dutt’s classic “Pyaasa”. Yet neither could earn even a single award nationally. But both movies received significant recognition in later years. Indian audience took notice of “Jagte Raho” only after it won the Grand Prix Award at the Karlovy Vary International Film Festival.

“Jagte Raho” was made in Bengali and Hindi simultaneously. The Bengali version was called “Ek Din Raatre”. The closed nature of the city and indifference of its people that form the theme for the movie gives Raj Kapoor another chance to give a mesmerizingly stunning performance. This set up of the movie has close resemblance to Raj’s earlier hit “Shree 420 (1955)”.

The debutant director duo Amit Moitra and Shombhu Mitra also were responsible for the story and the screenplay of the film. The story goes that Raj has invited the actor Shombhu to co-direct this movie with Amit. Shombhu directed only another movie later in Bengali in 1959, “Subha Bibaha”. I am not sure what Amit has done after this movie. One thing is for sure, neither one directed another Hindi movie. K.A. Abbas, who authored “Shree 420” earlier for Raj, wrote the dialogues for this film.

The movie boasts several good performances by many of the supporting actors. But the most brilliant one was by the venerable Motilal. As a drunk he gave one of the most memorable performances ever to hit the Indian screen. The song he sings on the screen, “Zindagi Khwaab Hai”, was done by Mukesh. Interestingly, Motilal was the one who brought Mukesh to Bombay when he heard him sing at his sister’s wedding. Interestingly, it was Manna Dey who was signed to sing this song. He did have a first cut of the song. But Raj changed his mind and wanted to Mukesh to sing the song. The movie was released with Mukesh’s version. Mannada’s version became available later on. I am including this in one of my posts.

Shankar & Jaikishan, who were regulars with Raj’s movies, did not compose music for this movie. Instead the honors went to Salil Chowdhury. Salilda took the opportunity to compose some beautiful tunes. Apart from “Zindagi” the other numbers that are worth their weight in gold are the bhangra song “Teiki Main Koi Jhoot Boliya”, Asha’s melodious “Thandi Thandi” and the beautiful “Jaago Mohan Pyaare” by Lataji. Incidentally, the piece of music composed at the end of the movie was later used by Salilda for Bimal Roy’s “Madhumati (1958)” in the song “Aaja Re Pardesi” at the suggestion of the lyricist Shailendra. Bimalda was initially reluctant to this idea but Salilda won him over.

Nargis made a cameo appearance in this movie near the end. This was the sixteenth and the last time Nargis and Raj Kapoor were in a movie together. Nargis parted her ways with Raj and married Sunil Dutt whom she met when she was working with him in “Mother India” the previous year.

I am uploading below all the songs from the movie in two back-to-back posts. The first post contains all the songs from the film. The second post contains some instrumentals.

The songs start in the next post…


swarapriya
Jagte Raho (1956) - Songs

Here are the songs from this fine album including Manna's version of "Zindagi"...
swarapriya
Jagte Raho (1956) - Instrumentals

Here are some instrumentals of songs from the film...
swarapriya
(Shakeel) Ghunghat (1960)

This movie was based on Tagore's famous novel "The Wreck". It was made earlier in Tamil and Telugu, both in 1956. Those films were directed by T. Prakasha Rao of "Sasural (1960)" fame. The Hindi version was directed by Ramanand Sagar, who became a household name with his "Ramayana" television series later on.

Tagore’s story revolved around a ship wreck. This was changed in Hindi, Telugu, and Tamil versions to a train accident. While the shooting was going for southern versions, there was a train accident in Ariyalur. The director Prakasha Rao used that footage of the accident and integrated into the movie to blend into the story nicely.

Both southern versions had disappointing run in theatres. However, the Hindi version was a huge hit. This may be in large part due to some fine music given by Ravi. Madhubala, who richly deserved the Filmfare best actress award for her performance in "Mughal-E-Azam (1960)" lost to Bina Rai in this movie. Rai's performance was really nothing to write home about.

I am uploading songs from this film in two back-to-back posts. Here is the first set of songs…
swarapriya
Concluding Songs from "Ghunghat (1960)"...

Here are the rest of the songs from this fine album...
swarapriya
(Anand Bakshi) Bedaag (1965)

Here are the songs from this album. Most of these are from a CD and some are from a DVD. The song "Bedhadak Daalo Rang" was contributed by Viraj Padhye, a member of this Forum. Incidentally, this song is neither available on CD nor on DVD. Thank you very much Viraj for this rare one.

Here is this and other songs from this album...
swarapriya
(Hasrat Jaipuri) Basant Bahar (1956)

Songs from this album were recently uploaded in this very thread. They are available starting at the following location...

http://www.hamaraforums.com/index.php?show...4658&st=634

swarapriya
(Javed Akhtar) Roop ki Rani Choron ka Raja (1993)

Basking from the glory of the success of “Mr. India (1987)” the team that was responsible for that film was assembled once again to make this film. Javed Akhtar Saab was hired to write the story. He also wrote the screenplay, dialogues and lyrics. LP once again composed music. Most of the cast remained intact except Anupam Kher who replaced Amrish Puri as the villain. Shekhar Kapur again was hired to direct the film.

Half way through the movie Kapur had creative differences with the producer and decided to quit. He was replaced by Satish Kaushik who finished the film. The movie’s budget bloated because of various delays and by the time it was ready for release it proved to be one of the most expensive movies ever made. The movie failed to click and proved to be a financial debacle.

Arshad Warsi who used to choreograph songs before turning into an actor was credited choreographing the title song.

I am uploading songs from this album, many elaborate and long numbers, in two back-to-back posts. Here is the first set of songs…
swarapriya
Concluding Songs from "Roop ki Rani Choron ka Raja (1993)"...

Here are the rest of the songs from this album...
swarapriya
(Majrooh) Tumsa Nahin Dekha (1957)

Finally here is the movie where real Shammi arrived. It was a long way coming but came he did and with such a thud that it made waves all over the Hindi film world. After this movie, for Shammi and his fans, the movies were never the same again.

Under the guidance of his wife Geeta Bali, Shammi went through a complete metamorphism for this movie. She was trying to give one last gasp try to save his professional carrier. With so many critics panning him to be another Raj Kapoor look-alike, he decided to shave his upper lip. He studied carefully why Elvis Presley and James Dean were so popular with youth all over the world. He groomed his hair in Jimmy Dean’s style. He took a guitar and added twists and turns to his acting a la Elvis even though he could not play it. These changes earned him in the industry the nick name of “Rebel Star”. This was mainly because of the changes he made for himself to appear as the star of the hit English movie “Rebel Without a Cause (1955)” that starred Jimmy Dean.

When "Tumsa Nahin Dekha" was released people immediately embraced this new incarnation of Shammi. He was an overnight box-office sensation. Things in Bombay film world were never the same anymore. Incidentally, Shammi was not the first choice of the producers for the role. It was initially offered to Dev Anand. Dev had some misgivings about the choice of the leading lady Ameeta and decided to decline the offer.

This movie had a first-time director, Nasir Hussain. He was a popular writer for Filmistan Studios. One of his most popular stories was Dev Anand-starrer "Munimji (1955)". Hussain also wrote the story and the screenplay for “Tumsa”. Its heroine, Ameeta was a protégé of the head of the Filmistan Studio. He was re-launching her with this movie. All the camera work, lighting, exposure, and publicity were carefully planned and centered around her. Even the title of the movie was selected in praise of her when Tolaram Jalan, the studio head, ran a contest among his employees to come up with a name for the movie. But when the movie was released, people flocked theaters to watch mostly Shammi and listen to OP's mesmerizingly magical music.

The movie's huge success was eminently aided by one of the best scores OP provided in his career until that time. The mantra was simple. The beat should be upbeat. The style should be snappy. It is this that helped the singing and swinging style for Shammi. If OP came up with riveting rhythms, Shammi became a perfect foil with his acrobatic dancing. For Hindi films, it was the dawn of a new hero. No more sighs. Just smiles. Rafi Saab’s incredibly melodious voice helped Shammi also discover his groove.

Every song from this film was a huge hit. Each one of them left a deep impression on its listeners. OP was superbly assisted by the singing of Rafi Saab and Ashaji. Majrooh Saab wrote all of the lyrics except the title song. The title song was written by Sahir Saab. Originally Sahir Saab was signed to write the lyrics for the movie. He was coming off from the career crowning achievement of penning lyrics for Guru Dutt's humane classic saga of a poet striving for recognition, "Pyaasa (1957)". Sahirji was in mood to write similar lyrics and was not ready for the type of lyrics this movie demanded. So Nasir Hussain quietly replaced Sahir Saab with Majrooh. Majrooh Saab did not disappoint. His association with Hussain Saab continued for years and years for many more movies.

I am uploading songs and a few version songs in two back-to-back posts. The title song sung by Asha that I am including here was not in the movie. There is a15 second talk by Shammi I am including where he talked about the changes he made to himself for “Tumsa”. Here are these and other delightful songs from this popular album starting in the next post…


swarapriya
Tumsa Nahin Dekha - Songs (1957)

Here are the songs from this popular album...
swarapriya
Tumsa Nahin Dekha (1957) - Specials

Here are version songs of a couple of popular songs from the film...
swarapriya
(Rajinder Krishan) Meenaar (1954)

Here are the songs from this album...
swarapriya
(Shailendra) Kismet ka Khel (1956)

Kishore Sahu wrote the story, screenplay, produced and directed this film that tells a simple story of a group of cheats who are good at heart and a wrongly accused man on the run who joins them to escape police. S&J songs are not generally what one expects from them. They are a bit let down. Here are the songs from this album…
swarapriya
(Shakeel) Kohinoor (1960) - Post 1 (Songs)

"Kohinoor" may not be a gem of a movie but it is one of those films that exploited Dilipji's talents to a maximum. One of our most gifted actors, here he exhibited his acting prowess by going from comedy to romantic hero to a tragedy king very effortlessly. For his portrayal he won the Best Actor Filmfare Award.

There is one "mirror" sequence in this movie between Dilip Saab and Jeevan that is very hilarious. This was a direct lift from the famous Marx Brothers' movie called "Duck Soup" made in 1933. Groucho was in that mirror sequence. Many years later, in 1955, Harpo Marx (brother of Groucho) reenacted the same mirror scene on the Lucille Ball TV show bringing down the house with laughter. By the way, in Amitabh's "Mard (1985)" a similar sequence was shot between Amitabh and Prem Chopra.

“Kohinoor” was a commercially successful movie. The music played a major part in that success. Naushadji displayed his versatility as a music composer with a classical song like “Madhuban Mein” on one hand and a beautiful romantic duet like “Do Sitaaron” on another hand and several other beautiful songs in between.

I am uploading songs and some specials in three back-to-back posts. First two posts contain all songs from the film. The third post contains a couple of version songs and some instrumentals. Here are the songs in the first post…
swarapriya
Kohinoor (1960) - Post 2 (Songs)

Here are the rest of the songs from this fine album...
swarapriya
Kohinoor (1960) - Post 3 (Specials)

Here are a couple of version songs and some instrumentals of the popular songs from the film...
swarapriya
(Anand Bakshi) Boxer (1965)

This is simply a bad movie. Producers trying to exploit the physique of Dara Singhji didn't have much of a story to begin with. Mumtaz is completely wasted in the film. LP's songs are about average with the exception of Lataji's solo "Do Nain". Here is this and other songs from this album...
swarapriya
(Hasrat Jaipuri) Begunah (1956)

Songs from this album were recently uploaded in this very thread. They are available starting at the following location...

http://www.hamaraforums.com/index.php?show...4658&st=652


swarapriya
(Javed Akhtar) Yugandhar (1993)

This movie was an ambitious undertaking to say the least, but in the end it is another crime and revenge drama where there is only a thin line between good and bad. Almost every coming scene can be easily anticipated as it has been rehashed so many times in previous films. As a result, the final product from director N. Chandra (of "Tezab (1988)" fame) was a total disappointment.

There are only four songs in the film but some of them are of longer duration. LP does a passable job in the music department. Here are the songs...
swarapriya
(Majrooh) Aakhri Dao (1958)

Here is another fine album from Madan Mohan Saab where every song is a delight. Asha has several beautiful numbers in this album. She and Rafi Saab dominate the proceedings. Rafi Saab has a heart rendering song in "Tujhe Kya Sunaaoon". Lata has only one duet in this Madan Mohanji's album and it is a beauty. The song is "Woh Chaand Muskaaya". Here is this and other songs from this fine album...
swarapriya
(Rajinder Krishan) Nagin (1954)

“Nagin” was inspired by the great Shakespearean play “Romeo and Juliet”. The novel thing about the movie is that it has a background of two rival groups of snake catchers living in some forest. But that is only part of the charm. It has the superb music composed by the great Hemantda. He was assisted by young Kalyanji Virji Shah (of Kalyanji-Anandji team) and another young man named Ravi Shanker Sharma (also known as Ravi), who will eventually become great music directors in their own right. Been music was played by Ravi. Kalyanji made use of an electronic instrument called Clavioline to generate some of the sounds for the songs. The use of the synthesizer was a first for an Indian movie.

The songs were such a craze when the movie was released that there were all kinds of stories of the effect of been music. Some rural touring theaters reported that while been music was being played it attracted several cobras into the theater and the panic stricken fans ran out of the theaters. These probably were tall tales but there is no denying to the fact that snake charmers used to play the music from the film as part of their show. This all sounds very fishy (or snaky) because snakes are deaf and only react to movements and heat.

Another winning point about the movie was the performance of its heroine, Vyjayanti Mala. A trained dancer, she was barely 17 or 18 when she acted in this movie. Her dances rivaled those of snakes and charmed movie goers all over India and suddenly she became a force to reckon within the Hindi film field.

The movie was like one prolonged song and dance sequence. It is a celebration of young love and life; restless, exciting, hallucinating, intoxicating, and charmingly mesmerizing. Let us have some fun with these beautiful songs. I am uploading all songs and several instrumentals in five separate posts. The first two posts contain songs from the film. The other three posts contain instrumentals of some of the popular songs from the movie.

Here is the first set of songs starting in the next post…


swarapriya
Nagin (1954) - Post 1 (Songs)

This and the next post contain songs from the film. Here is the first part...
swarapriya
Nagin (1954) - Post 2 (Songs)

Here are the rest of the songs from this beautiful album...
swarapriya
Nagin (1954) - Post 3 (Instrumentals)

Here are some instrumentals of some of the popular songs from the film...
swarapriya
Nagin (1954) - Post 4 (Instrumentals)

Here are more instrumentals of some of the popular songs from this film...
swarapriya
Nagin (1954) - Post 5 (Instrumentals)

This final post has some more instrumentals of some of the popular songs from the film...
swarapriya
(Shailendra) New Delhi (1956)

Here is another beautiful album from Shankar & Jaikishan. Even though the movie is dated yet there is no denying to the fact that it has an endearing story. Rajinder Singh Bedi’s touching humane story revolves around the theme of integration. It highlights that we should live peacefully in spite of our differences between our habits, different spoken languages, North versus South, one caste compared to the other, and other topics. These serious topics were told in an entertaining style. The net result was that this movie proved to be a crowd pleaser when it was originally released.

The album boasts beautiful songs, all solos, six by Lata and three by Kishoreda. All songs were winners with Lata's "Tum Sang" a chartbuster and so were all three of Kishoreda's songs. My favorite from this album is Kishoreda's beauty, "Nakhrewaali". I don't think anyone else can sing such a song except for Kishoreda. Yodeling, inflections of sounds, modulation of the tone, such total control over the voice, Kishoreda was undoubtedly a master of it.

I am uploading all songs from an original soundtrack album in two back-to-back posts. Here is the first set of songs…
swarapriya
Concluding Songs from "New Delhi (1956)"...

Here are the rest of the songs from this beautiful album...


swarapriya
(Shakeel) Mughal-E-Azam (1960)

"Mughal-E-Azam" was probably the most magnificent movie ever to adorn an Indian screen. Every scene of this movie exudes excellence, commitment, compassion, and myriad colors of opulence. Made with such care and love of art and craft, it stood the test of time like the blissful beauty in the center of this movie, the ever enchanting late great Madhubala.

Here are some of the facts surrounding this movie (some of the following material is borrowed from our fellow member Saksham Sharma’s write up)…

K. Asif, the producer and director of the movie, originally wanted to make the movie in mid-40 with Nargis as Anrakali, Chandramohan as Salim, and Sapru as Akbar. The plans were abandoned when Chandramohan died and most of the actors hired to star in the movie migrated to Pakistan after the partition.

The movie was in production for nearly a decade.

It was the costliest movie ever made until that time.

Dilip was sent to London to model so that he can get the best fit of the wig they ordered for his role.

Asif Saab originally planned to film the movie in color. But with unusual length the movie was taking to undergo production because of the detailed preparations, he has to bow to the pressures of the financiers and distributors and has to shoot the movie in black & white. A couple of songs and the climax were shot in color. But nearly 85% of the movie was in black & white.

Asifji oversaw every detail of the movie.

Costumes were tailored by Delhi-based professionals.

For embroidery, folks from Surat were employed.

Jewelry was made by the goldsmiths from Hyderabad.

Kolhapur craftsmen took care of the designs of the crowns.

Weapons used in the film were made by Rajasthani ironsmiths.

To design authentic looking footwear Asif utilized the talents of folks from Agra.

The magnificent Mughal Darbar was built by 150 carpenters, many decorators, and several painters.

Battle scenes were staged elaborately with thousands in cast. Many of the soldiers used in these scenes came from the Indian Army’s Jaipur regiment. Nearly 8,000 troops were used. They also used 4,000 horses and 2,000 camels. R.D. Mathur, who photographed the movie, used eight different cameras to capture the battle scenes.

Madhubala wore real chains for her prison scenes. Because of their weight and the strain and duress caused by them, plus the health problems she was having, she has to nurse her bruises for days before returning to the shooting again.

Dilip Kumar was at odds with the director when Asif Saab told him the top billing will be given to Prithviraj Kapoor as the movie was told from his point of view. The situation aggravated when Dilip learned as the movie was progressing that his younger sister who was a frequent visitor to the shooting was having an affair with Asif. An outraged Dilip stopped talking to Asif even though he cooperated in finishing his acting assignment.

The movie was dubbed into Tamil and English. Both versions were flops.

The song “Pyaar Kiya” was actually shot in the Sheesh Mahal palace for a huge cost.

Music director Naushadji worked with the lyricist Shakeel Badayuni Saab many grueling hours that turned into days to get the right effect for the song “Pyaar Kiya”. By one estimate, the lyrics and the music were changed over 100 times before everyone was satisfied with the results.

Rafi Saab’s “Zindabad” song had a chorus of 100 singers accompanying him in the song.

Many songs were composed for the film by Naushad Saab. But not all of them were used in the film. By one estimate, Naushadji may have composed as many as 20 songs for the film.

Bade Ghulam Ali Saab sang two songs for the film. Initially when approached by Naushadji and Asif Saab, Ali Saab declined to sing. The story goes that Ali Saab demanded nearly 100 times the remuneration of other playback singers were getting those days to sing. He thought this would get rid of Asif Saab. However, Asif Saab agreed and paid the remuneration demanded.

The movie was released and became a roaring success and broke every box-office record of those days.

Critics were all praise for the movie. However, Dilip’s performance was heavily criticized as most thought he could have done better.

The movie received six Filmfare nominations in the categories of the Best Picture, the Best Director, the Best Actress, the Best Music, the Best Dialogues, and the Best Cinematography. It won the awards for the Best Picture, the Best Dialogues, and the Best Cinematography.

Asifji refused to accept the award for Best Picture as he was very upset that his film deserved better recognition with more awards and because the judges turned a cold shoulder towards it.

Most personalities associated with this movie have passed away. (The two living legends are Dilip Kumar Saab and Lataji.) That the legacy these folks left behind stood the test of time is evident when this movie was colorized and re-released in 2004 and became a success.

Naushadji composed memorable and beautiful songs to the lyrics penned by Shakeel Badayuni Saab. Like the legend of "Anarkali" they still stay youthful with overflow of conviction of love.

All songs I am uploading here in two back-to-back posts are from an original soundtrack album and a DVD. I will upload these starting in the next post…


swarapriya
Mughal-E-Azam (1960) - Post 1 (Songs)

I am uploading songs from this beautiful album in two back-to-back posts. Here is the first set...
swarapriya
Mughal-E-Azam (1960) - Post 2 (Songs)

Here are the rest of the songs from this fine album...
swarapriya
(Anand Bakshi) Dil Se Mile Dil (1965)

I do not have a single song from this album. I am requesting members to share any songs from this film they may have. Many thanks...
swarapriya
(Hasrat Jaipuri) Chori Chori (1956)

Songs from this film were recently uploaded in this very thread. They are available starting at the following location...

http://www.hamaraforums.com/index.php?show...4658&st=665

swarapriya
(Javed Akhtar) 1942 - A Love Story (1994)

Producer & director Vidhu Vinod Chopra originally had Madhuri Dixit in mind when he developed the story for this film. But because of other commitments Dixit was not readily available. The role went to Manisha who was a relatively newcomer to the industry. When the movie was released her looks and performance won the hearts over of movie going public. She became an established actress.

This was the first movie that was shot in Dolby stereo. This was also the first movie to show the leading pair kissing each other. That earned it U/A certificate from the censors.

But most of all the movie will be remembered for its mesmerizingly mellifluous music. This movie was a crowning achievement of R.D. Burman’s genius as a music director. Burmanda passed away before the movie was released but he left an indelible mark with songs that will be remembered for ages. All songs from the film were massive hits. Javed Akhtar Saab who wrote the lyrics was simply brilliant in his penmanship.

The movie was nominated for several Filmfare Awards. Jackie Shroff won the Best Supporting Actor Award. It was Burmanda for the Best Music Award. Akhtar Saab won the Best Lyrics Award for “Ek Ladki”. Kumar Sanu won the Best Male Playback Singer Award for the same song. Kavita Krishnamurthy won the Best Female Playback Singer Award for the song “Pyaar Hua”.

I am uploading these songs and some instrumentals of these popular songs in three back-to-back posts. Here is the first set…
swarapriya
Concluding Songs from "1942 - A Love Story (1994)"...

Here are the rest of the songs from this unforgettable album...
swarapriya
Instrumentals of Some Songs from "1942 - A Love Story (1994)"...

Here are some of the instrumentals of some of the popular songs from this film...
swarapriya
(Majrooh) Chalti ka Naam Gaadi (1958)

I do not understand how the tax related economics work but apparently Kishoreda to avoid huge amounts he owed in income taxes made a couple of movies, one in Bengali and the other in Hindi, hoping that they will flop. The Bengali version, “Lookochuri”, starring Kishoreda opposite Mala Sinha with Hemantda’s music made in 1958, instead clicked in a big way and became a hit. He also made in the same year, 1958, the Hindi film, “Chalti ka Naam Gaadi”. As luck would have it, the Hindi film also was a huge hit.

A disgusted Kishoreda ceded all his rights to the movie, “Gaadi”, by gifting them to his secretary friend, Anoop Sharma. Kishoreda and his problem with income tax officers persisted till his death.

Aloke Dasgupta was the cameraman of the “Gaadi”. He was only 23 years old when he was put in charge by Kishoreda to photograph the movie. Dasgupta also played another important role. As Kishoreda’s romance with Madhubala started progressing, he became the couple’s confidante.

Kishoreda originally signed Kamal Mazumdar to direct both “Lookochuri” and “Gaadi”. But Mazumdar became nervous on the first day of the shoot of the “Gaadi” movie. Directing three brothers he felt was a daunting task and decided not to proceed. Satyen Bose was a friend of Kishoreda who directed him and Ashok in their previous movie together, “Bandi (1957)”. At Kishore’s request, Bose came in to direct the first scene even before knowing what he was getting into.

Satyen Bose was not happy with the choice of the cameraman because of Aloke’s lack of experience. The picturization of “Ek Ladki” was a test case for Aloke. After the shooting of the song was completed, Bose was happy with the results, and Aloke stayed as the cameraman.

When the movie was released it became a huge hit. Its songs became a rage. The duet, “Haal Kaisa Hai”, went on to adorn Binaca Geetmala’s weekly top of the charts for more than a year. My own favorite is Kishoreda’s solo “Ek Ladki”. Apparently the song was inspired by Tennesse Ernie’s English song from his album “16 Tons”. Both Jaidev and RD were assistants to SD.

I am uploading songs from this album in three back-to-back posts. The first post contains all of the songs from the film. The second post contains some specials. The third post contains some of the instrumentals of some of the popular songs from the film. These start beginning in the next post…


swarapriya
Chalti ka Naam Gaadi (1958) - Post 1 (Songs)

Here are all the songs from this beautiful album...
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