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swarapriya
Suraj (1966) - Post 2 - Concluding Songs from the Film & Instrumentals on Flute

Here are the rest of the songs from this popular musical and a few instrumentals on the flute...
swarapriya
Suraj (1966) - Post 3 - Instrumentals on Guitar

Here are a few instrumentals of the song "Bahaaro" on various guitars...
swarapriya
Suraj (1966) - Post 4 - Instrumentals on Keyboard

Here are a few instrumentals of the song "Bahaaro" on various keyboards...
swarapriya
Suraj (1966) - Post 5 - Instrumentals on Saxophone

Here are a few instrumentals of the song "Bahaaro" on saxophone...
swarapriya
Suraj (1966) - Post 6 - Songs on Various Instruments

Here are a few instrumentals of the songs from the film on various instruments...
swarapriya
(Majrooh) Pardesi (1970)

This predictable story had some life thanks to a good performance by the beautiful Mumtaz and a few good songs composed by Chitraguptji. It has been many moons ago (December 4, 2017) last we heard his songs in this column. Here are all the songs from the film…
swarapriya
(Rajinder Krishan) Nai Roshni (1967)

Director Srdihar (“Nazrana (1961)”, “Dil Ek Mandir (1963)”, “Pyar Kiye Jaa (1966)”) made better movies than this kludge of a family drama. He put together a good set of actors but major characters in the movie were ill defined. But one thing redeems this movie. The combination of Ravi, Rajinder Krishan, and Rafi Saab deliver songs that will be remembered for ages. Rafi Saab’s four solos give a glimpse of why he was one of the greatest singers of our time. Ravi composed all these songs to touchingly moving great lyrics by Rajinder Krishanji. There are other songs that are also very good. Of them one of my favorites is Asha’s “Yeh Tohfa”. Asha is simply scintillating in singing this beautiful song.

The movie title credits show Krishna Kalle as one of the playback singers. I could only think of the snippet “Gamya” as a possibility. Perhaps a full version of this song exists. There is another snippet “Aakhir” that has a male voice singing it. It was picturized on Raaj Kumar. I do not believe Rafi Saab was the singer. I had a feeling that actor Raaj Kumar may have lent his voice. I invite experts to clarify who the correct singers for these two snippets are. Thank you.

I am uploading these and other songs from the film in two back-to-back posts. Here are the songs in the first post…
swarapriya
Concluding Songs from "Nai Roshni (1967)"...

Here are the rest of thr songs from this fine album...
swarapriya
(Shailendra) Guide (1965)

"Guide" was undoubtedly a pinnacle of achievement for Anand Brothers, Dev and Vijay. It has a fascinating history behind how a bestselling novel transformed into a fabulous movie. Dev Anand read R.K. Narayan's novel "The Guide" and decided to make it into a movie. Even though Narayan initially refused, Dev, a master of persuasion convinced the author to allow him to make the novel into a movie.

Convinced that the novel has the universal appeal, Dev next set his eyes on making this in Hindi as well as English. He was able to find the Nobel laureate author Pearl S. Buck (for her work "Good Earth") to coproduce with him. Next he chose Waheeda Rehman to be his heroine. Initially Waheeda was hesitant to play the role. Mainly because the movie dealt with adultery and playing that role she thought may prove to be committing a professional suicide. Again Dev used his charm and persuading power to win Waheeda over to accept the role.

Dev hired Ted Danielwski, a Hollywood man, to direct the English version. Dev wanted Vijay, his younger brother, to direct the Hindi version. But Vijay refused the offer thinking that the movie if made would ruin the image of India abroad. Dev went back to Vijay after making more arrangements for the movie. Vijay refused again stating the same reasons. By this time English version went into production. Never to give up, convinced it should be Vijay who should be handling the Hindi version of the movie, Dev went back to Vijay and persuaded him to change his mind. Third time was charm for Dev and his perseverance finally paid off. Vijay consented to direct the movie independent of the English version.

At nobody’s surprise Burmanda was signed to compose music for the Hindi version. Shailendra was assigned to pen the lyrics. Vijay wrote the screenplay and dialogues for the Hindi version. He also edited the movie. While the preparations for Hindi version were going on, Dev spent considerable energy to finish the English version first. That he did.

Dev had high hopes on the English version. But it was a resounding flop. Disappointed but undeterred Dev was determined even more so to continue with the Hindi version.

The novelist R.K. Narayan, on whose novel the movie was based, saw the script Vijay wrote and decided to disown the entire project. His main objection was that the screenplay was not completely true to his original work. Vijay's argument was that the changes were necessary to make some cinematic allowances. His point was that the story was written sometime back and was dated. To fit the existing atmosphere and maintain the continuity of the theme he felt that some changes were imminent.

The movie itself was bold in its theme by even today's (after 48 years) Indian movie standards. In the end when the movie was completed, this labor of love and hard work, “Guide”, was a huge hit. It was Dev's first color production. Burmanda's music was a rage. Every song was a marvel. Kishoreda had a duet with Lataji. But it was Lataji and Rafi Saab that took all the accolades. "Aaj Phir Jeene Ki", "Piya Tose Naina", and "Saiyya Beimaan (the superb tabla music was performed by Pandit Shiv Kumar Sharma)" are melodious masterpieces with Burmanda's stamp all over them. Rafi Saab had three mesmerizing solos in "Dinn Dhal Jaaye", "Kya Se Kya Ho Gaya", and "Tere Mere Sapne." Burmanda had two great songs himself. One of his songs, “Wahaan Kaun Hai Tera (I am including the original Bengali version of this song, also sung by Burmanda, in the third post)", perfectly accentuates the mood of the film. Mannada also made a small contribution by singing one song.

"Guide" went on to win an unprecedented seven Filmfare awards for that year. The awards were for: Best Film, Best Director, Best Actress, Best Actor, Best Story, Best Dialogues, and Best Cinematography. One of the grave omission and unforgivable mistake by the award committee was not to recognize Burmanda for such wonderfully everlasting music. He richly deserved the award! Instead that award went to Shankar-Jaikishan duo for their efforts for the movie "Suraj", which also had some beautiful songs. But they were not in the same class as those composed by Burmanda for this film. If awards are a criterion for recognition, then for all the great music he created, Burmanda probably was the one least recognized. (Madan Mohan Ji was another one. But at least most of the movies for which Burmanda composed music were hits whereas several of Madan Mohan Saab’s movies did not fare well at the box office.)

The Hindi version of the movie “Guide” was an Oscar entry that year. The 1964 “Guide” was invited to participate for a screening at a recent Cannes Film Festival in the World Classic category. Even after this many years, what an honor! Here is another note. Dev, the indomitable spirit and the evergreen hero he was, hasn’t made a good movie in his last 30 or so years. But he continued to make movie after a movie each year and was seriously thinking of re-releasing the English version of the “Guide” before he passed away…

I am uploading songs from this film in eight back-to-back posts. The first two posts contain all songs from the film. The third post contains specials with introductions. The fourth post contains some of the version songs. Because of the enormous popularity of the songs from the film, it has inspired many budding as well as seasoned independent musicians to have the songs instrumentalized on their favorite instruments. I am uploading some of these in the last four posts.

The songs start beginning with the next post…



swarapriya
Guide (1965) - Post 1 - Songs

Here are the first set of songs from this film...
swarapriya
Guide (1965) - Post 2 - Songs

Here are rest of the songs, a few musical clips and instrumentals of this film...
swarapriya
Guide (1965) - Post 3 - Specials

Here are a few specials related to the songs from this film...
swarapriya
Guide (1965) - Post 4 - Version Songs

Here are a few version songs...
swarapriya
Guide (1965) - Post 5 - Instrumentals

Here are a few instrumentals of the song "Aaj Phir" and others...
swarapriya
Guide (1965) - Post 6 - Instrumentals

Here are a few instrumentals of the songs "Dinn Dhal" and "Gaata Rahe"...
swarapriya
Guide (1965) - Post 7 - Instrumentals

Here are a few instrumentals of "Piya Tose" and "Tere Mere"...
swarapriya
Guide (1965) - Post 8 - Instrumentals

Here are a few more instrumentals in this concluding post...
swarapriya
(Anand Bakshi) Baghi (1972)

This film directed by Rajkumar Kohli had music by Laxmikant & Pyarelal with lyrics written by Anand Bakshi. I do not have a single song from this film. I am requesting our members to share any songs they may have from this film. Thank you.

swarapriya
(Hasrat Jaipuri) Teesri Kasam (1966)

Here is one of the great movies of Indian cinema. Everything in this movie comes together as a tranquil distilled morning of a beautifully silent village. The acting, the story telling, the direction, the lyrics, the songs, and the whole gamut makes this one an outstanding achievement.

Shailendra bought rights to make this movie from a short story "Maare Gaye Gulfaam" by Phanishwar Nath Renu. He was fascinated with the two principle characters in the story and was willing to spend whatever he has to see the movie made. Shailendra originally had Meena Kumari and Mahmood in the roles that were eventually played by Waheeda and Raj respectively. He took an unknown Basu Bhattacharya, who was an assistant to the great Bimal Roy, to direct the movie. The simplicity and the lyrical nature of the movie has the imprint of a Bimalda’s movies all over.

Raj was a close and good friend of Shailendra. He had this inkling that this movie was not going to fly. He advised Shailendra against making the movie. But Shailendra was obsessed to see this movie through. It was said that Raj didn't want to take any remuneration for the movie. However, at Shailendra's insistence, he took one Rupee as a token for his efforts.

Raj apparently was not too happy with the choice of Basu Bhattacharya as the director. Basu was new and Raj was irked with the way things were shaping up. In the end, this movie proved to be the greatest achievement of Basu.

The movie was originally scheduled to be shot in Bihar where the actual story takes place. But because of the dacoit problems many other sites were considered. Finally Igatpuri was selected. This is the same place where Bimalda's lyrical poem on celluloid, "Madhumati (1958)", was shot.

Both Waheeda and Raj, who appeared a bit older for the character and heavier, gave wonderful performances. The performance of Waheeda reminds one of the heights she scaled in "Pyaasa (1957)" and "Guide (1965)". Shankar and Jaikishan provided some of the best music of their lives to some magnificent lyrics written by Shailendra and Hasrat Jaipuri. Their music captured the simplicity, rustic nature, sweetness, and charm of rural areas. Dattaram and Sebstian were the assistant music directors.

The male version of the song “Duniya Banaane Waale” appeared twice in the film. The second one is not different from the first one, but it is only part of it with some music associated with it. A note about the qawwaal duo Shankar & Shambhu who sang the legend of “Laila & Majnu” with Mubarak Begum. A portion of this appeared in the film earlier as part of the advertisement for the “nautankee” performance. I am uploading all of these in one of the posts.

This labor of love of Shailendra, "Teesri Kasam", when released won unanimous critical acclaim. But it was a financial disaster. Shailendra lost everything he owned. A broken man, Shailendra passed away on December 14, 1966. Ironically, December 14 also happened to be Raj's birthday.

"Teesri Kasam" won the President's Gold Medal for that year. It was also nominated for the Grand Prix award at the 1967 Moscow International Film Festival. The movie also won several awards from Bengal Film Journalists Association.

There are many songs in this album, and each one of them is a sheer beauty. I am uploading these in the first three posts. The last two posts consist of a few instrumentals of the songs from the film.

The songs start beginning with the next post…


swarapriya
Teesri Kasam (1966) - Post 1 - Songs

Here is the first portion of the songs from the film...
swarapriya
Teesri Kasam (1966) - Post 2 - Songs

Here is the next set of songs from this beautiful musical...
swarapriya
Teesri Kasam (1966) - Post 3 - Songs

Here is the last set of songs from this great film...
swarapriya
Teesri Kasam (1966) - Post 4 - Instrumentals

Here are few instrumentals of the songs from the film...
swarapriya
Teesri Kasam (1966) - Post 5 - Instrumentals

Here is the last set of instrumentals of songs from the film...
swarapriya
(Majrooh) Raton ka Raja (1970)

This is another horrendous movie. It wanted to be a James Bondish movie. But it does not come even close. They have one Dheeraj Kumar as the hero who seems to have no clue what acting means. Usually reliable Jeevan as a villain is attired as Hitler but does not make any impression. Shatrughan Sinha appears as a goon to the villain in an insignificant role. Looking at this it is difficult to predict that he is going to be a big star one day. RD’s music is passable with average songs but great background score. He uses saxophone extensively for the background music and to some extent even in the songs. These sounds have unmistakable footprint of the great sax player, Manohari Singh. Singhji assisted RD in many films under the name Manohari. However he was not listed in the credits of the film.

I am uploading all songs from the film in the first post. The second post contains various music clips. Here are the songs…
swarapriya
Few Music Clips from "Raton ka Raja (1970)"...

Here are a few music clips from this film...
swarapriya
(Rajinder Krishan) Brahmachari (1968)

Here is a beautiful musical from Shankar & Jaikishan. It also has a heartwarming performance by the leading man, Shammi. Then there is that electric presence of Mumtaz in a supporting role. I don't think she ever looked this slim and this pretty. During the filming of this movie, according to rumours, Shammi and Mumtaz were romantically involved. May be that showed whenever Mumtaz appeared on the screen.

This movie won several Filmfare awards. It won for the Best Film, the Best Story (Sachin Bhowmick), the Best Actor (Shammi Kapoor), the Best Music (Shankar & Jaikishan), the Best Lyrics (Shailendra for "Main Gaaoon"), and the Best Male Playback Singer (Mohd. Rafi Saab for "Dil Ke Jharonkon Mein").

There are seven songs in this film, all sung by Rafi Saab. Six of them are solos and one is a duet. All songs are good, but the song "Dil Ke Jharoke Mein" is one of my all-time favorites of Rafi Saab. He was absolutely phenomenal and simply fabulous the way he sings this song.

Sebastian D’Souza was the assistant music director.

I will upload these songs in four back-to-back posts. The first two posts contain all the songs from the film and a few version songs by Sonu Nigam. The last two posts contain instrumentals of some of the songs from the film. Here are the songs in the first post…
swarapriya
Concluding Songs from "Brahmachari (1968)"...

Here are the rest of the songs from this film and a couple of version songs...
swarapriya
Instrumentals from "Brahmachari (1968)"

Here are a few instrumentals of the song "Aaj Kal" from the film...
swarapriya
Few More Instrumentals from "Brahmachari (1968)"

Here are a few more instrumentals of the songs from the film...
swarapriya
(Shailendra) Gumnaan (1965)

All songs from this film were uploaded earlier in this very thread. They are available starting at the following location...

http://www.hamaraforums.com/index.php?show...mp;#entry752608




swarapriya
(Anand Bakshi) Buniyaad (1972)

In this very forgettable movie there are only four songs. But two of them are simply outstanding. These are Lataji’s solo “Dard-E-Dil” and her duet with Kishoreda “Pukaaro”. My favorite is “Dard-E-Dil”. Great touching lyrics. Fine composition. Melodious rendition. I am uploading these songs, few music clips, and a couple of version songs in two back-to-back posts. Here are the songs in the first post…
swarapriya
Few Music Clips from "Buniyaad (1972)"...

Here are a few music clips from this film...
swarapriya
(Hasrat Jaipuri) Aman (1967)

“Aman” was a movie with a noble message. It tells the perils of war and dangers associated with nuclear weapons. On the surface it appeared to have everything going for it. Great theme, the jubilee hero paired with Saira Banu, supported by many fine character actors, and unforgettable songs. But for some curious reasons that movie did not work out as well as expected. There are few scenes in the film that reminds one of Kumar’s earlier hit “Dil Ek Mandir (1963)”. Otherwise the movies are totally different.

The movie even had a special appearance by the late philosopher, mathematician, and Nobel laurate Bertrand Russell counseling the hero. I cannot say that with this type of theme, it could have been easily preachy. On the contrary. Amidst all the problems there was romance, beautiful scenery shot in various locations of Japan, and Shankar & Jaikishan’s inspired music with not just the songs but also the background music. There is even a cabaret dance performed by Mary Lazoff and Arnes Selfors from Oslo, Norway whose famous outing was with “Duo Arnedis”. There are two beautiful solos by Lata and six solos by the great Rafi Saab. These songs show how versatile Rafi Saab was when singing romantic lovelies to emotion packed poignant songs or anything in between. S&J were assisted by Dattaram & Sebastian.

I am uploading all songs and a few instrumentals in three back-to-back posts. Here are the songs in the first post…
swarapriya
Concluding Songs from "Aman (1967)"...

Here are the rest of the songs and a few music clips from this film...
swarapriya
Few Instrumentals of the Songs from "Aman (1967)"...

Here are a few instrumentals of the songs from this film...
swarapriya
(Majrooh) Bikhre Moti (1971)

This is another familiar familial story that was done badly. Even the songs and music are below average. I am uploading all songs here. A note about the song “Jalti Rahe”. Parts of this song appear three times in the film. The movie starts with this song and ends with it. In between it appears one more time. The second part includes the entire first part plus another antara. The third part is simply part of the mukhda of the first part of the song.

Here is this and other songs…
swarapriya
(Rajinder Krishan) Ek Kali Muskayee (1968)

This movie was based on an unconvincing and uneven story about a loveless woman. But there are few worthwhile things one can take home. Most of the movie revolved around the hapless woman played by the newcomer Meara Joglekar. She is the daughter of the producer and director of the movie, Vasant Joglekar. Sumati Joglekar, a renowned Marathi film actress is her mother. For a debutante Meera did a great job. Curiously this was the only film she appeared in. Perhaps the failure of the movie may have something to do with it.

The other highlight of the movie was its outstanding music composed by Madan Mohanji. Here Mohanji was once again was joined by Rajinder Krishanji whose lyrics sparkle with their richness. Songs were all sung by either Lataji or Rafi Saab. All Lataji’s songs are simply gems. Rafi Saab’s songs, except for “Junglee Kabutar”, are also memorable. The title song appeared three times in the movie. Even though there is some overlap in these, they are different the way Rafi Saab sang them. I am uploading all three of them here. Incidentally, Lataji’s song “Pyaar Kya Hota Hai” was not included in the film. I have two favorites in this movie. One is Lataji’s beautiful rendition of the exhilarating lovely “Main Toh Pee Ki” and the other is Rafi Saab’s extravagant romantic song “Zulf Bikhraati”.

Mahmood’s role in the film did not fit the proceedings. His portion was totally unnecessary. For the umpteenth time he was playing a lover fooling his would be father-in-law attiring various disguises. The movie would have been better off without him. His tiresome antics stalled the continuity and progress of the film.

I am uploading a couple of snippets sang by Mohanji. Madan Saab apparently had the habit of rehearsing songs himself to ensure that they sounded right. These snippets were lifted directly from his official website. They have very poor audio. Therefore I am uploading them at a lower bit rate.

I am uploading all songs from this beautiful album and a few instrumentals in three back-to-back posts. Here are the songs in the first post…
swarapriya
Concluding Songs from "Ek Kali Muskayee (1968)"...

Here are the rest of the songs from this film...
swarapriya
Few Instrumentals of "Ek Kali Muskayee (1968)" Song...

Here are a few instrumentals of the song "Na Tum Bewafa Ho" from the film...
swarapriya
(Shailendra) Janwar (1965)

Songs from this album were recently uploaded in this very thread. They are available starting at the following location...

http://www.hamaraforums.com/index.php?show...mp;#entry752668




swarapriya
(Anand Bakshi) Ek Bechara (1972)

There is not much to write about this movie. This was one of the early pictures of both Rekha and Vinod Khanna. Rekha looked plump and was playing a routine role as the leading lady. Khanna in a supporting role was villain. The movie’s music, lyrics, and songs were all a total disappointment. The only thing worth remembering is Pran’s fine performance. He once again proved why he was such a great actor and why he endured the fame and filmdom for so long.

The songs, all except for one, were taken from a VCD. Their quality is adequate but I have decided to upload all of them at a lower bit rate. Please note that the song “Ho Naina” has a skip at 6:57. Here are the songs…
swarapriya
(Hasrat Jaipuri) An Evening in Paris (1967)

Shakti Samanta, who produced and directed this film, brought back the team of Sharmila & Shammi of his earlier hit “Kashmir Ki Kali (1961)” for this film. Sharmila was introduced to Hindi audience in “Kali”. In this movie she played twins. Sharmila looked stunningly lovely. She looked gorgeous in anything she wore, like sarees, skirts, and bikinis. Shammi looked a bit older and beginning to show signs of weight problem. Nevertheless he was his usual engaging self.

The movie treads the familiar path and offers nothing new. But it is a feast to watch all the exotic locations outside of India. Another great fun about the movie was its music and songs. There are plenty of them. Shankar & Jaikishan were at the helm of music department. One can see they were having a ball doing it. Even the background music is very rich and pleasing to ears.

If you love Rafi Saab, you are in for a treat here. He sang six solos and a beautiful duet with Asha. All songs were chartbusters when the movie was released. My favorite is that mellifluous magic rendered by Asha and Rafi Saab in the song “Raat Ke Humsafar”. Even with repeated listening one can never get enough of it.

Dattaram was the assistant music director.

I am uploading all songs from the film plus several music clips in the first two posts. The third post contains Sonu Nigam’s version songs of some of Rafi Saab’s solos from the film. With so many beautiful songs, the music of the film provided plenty of impetus for amateur musicians to play the tunes on their favorite instruments. The last three posts contain some of these instrumentals.

Here are the songs in the first post from this beautiful album...
swarapriya
Concluding Songs from "An Evening in Paris (1967)"...

Here are the rest of the songs and a few music clips from this popular musical...
swarapriya
Few Version Songs of "An Evening in Paris (1967)"...

Here are a few version songs of Rafi Saab's songs from the film by Sonu Nigam...
swarapriya
Few Instrumentals of Songs from "An Evening in Paris (1967)"...

Here are a few instrumentals of the songs from the film...
swarapriya
Few More Instrumentals of Songs from "An Evening in Paris (1967)"...

Here are a few more instrumentals of the songs from the film...
swarapriya
Additional Instrumentals of Songs from "An Evening in Paris (1967)"...

Here are some more instrumentals of the songs from the film...
swarapriya
(Majrooh) Buddha Mil Gaya (1971)

This movie, a comedy cum murder mystery, was directed by Hrishikesh Mukherjee. With him at the helm I expected a lot. Unfortunately I was disappointed. The problem with the movie was that it was not sure if it wants to be a comedy or a mystery. It ended up as neither. Especially nearly last 30 minutes of the movie was simply mayhem which was unexpected with Hrishida handling it.

My disappointment was some what overcome by one of the most beautiful musical movie compositions by RD. It is simply amazing to appreciate his understanding of the range of versatility and the depth of the music he possessed. There are only five songs in the film. But four of them are simply superb. Lataji’s song “Jiya Naa Mora” is simply a classic. Talking about classic, Manna’s great rendition of “Aayo Kahaan Se” is a class in itself. He was joined by the actress Archana for a few seconds near the end of the song. Then the duet by Asha and Kishoreda is like top of the pop. But the song which stole the show, one of my all-time favorites of Kishoreda, is “Raat Kali”. Majrooh Saab once again delivered powerful lyrics for these songs.

The song “Raat Kali” appeared twice in the film. The first time only “Mukhda”. The second time the complete song appeared. I am uploading only the second one. A note about the song “Aayo Kahaan Se”. This song appeared piecemeal three times in the film, each different from others. I am uploading all three here. But in the DVD I saw the film, these three did not cover the entire song. However, many CD versions carry the full version. I am uploading the full version also here.

With so many popular songs, it gave a field day for amateur musicians practice them on their favorite instruments. I am uploading several of them here.

All in all there are five posts. First two posts contain all songs from the film. The second post also contains a few specials. The next three posts contain various instrumentals. Please note that instrumentals in Post 4 are all from various CD collections but others are from videos.

Here are these beautiful songs in the first post…
swarapriya
Concluding Songs from "Buddha Mil Gaya (1971)"...

Here are the rest of the songs from this film and a few specials about these songs...
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