Help - Search - Members - Calendar
Full Version: Shair Aur Sargam
Hamara Forums > Music > Sangeet Ke Sitarey
Pages: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42, 43
swarapriya
QUOTE(soumik @ Aug 16 2018, 10:22 AM) *

Dear Swarapriya,

Burmanda was born and brought up in Tripura; not Assam.

Thanks for the album

Soumik



Soumik, thanks for the info. Cheers.


swarapriya
(Anand Bakshi) Heera Panna (1973)

I am uploading these songs to accommodate a request by skipping the usual chronological order that I was following for this thread...

Dev Anand followed his hit film of 1971 “Hare Rama Hare Krishna” with this movie, “Heera Panna”. Like the “Krishna” movie, he wrote the story for this film, produced and directed it, also acted in it. He took Zeenat from that film as the principal lead for this film.

When the movie was released, everyone talked about Zeenat and her bikini draped body but the one who stole the show was Raakhee. Raakhee was simply stunning to look at. She was beautifully clad in sarees that accentuated her grace and was lovely to look at. A beautiful woman she is, Raakhee was director’s and photographer’s delight and they were very careful in choosing her shots.

This movie was a modest success. It would have been another great one if only Dev kept it going as he did the first two-thirds. It was a delightful ride. Execution by the director was just about perfect. Then suddenly everything is jumbled up. In the last one-third of the movie all mayhem gets loose with umpteen number of villains pursuing the hero to snatch the stolen diamond from him. 10 or 15 minutes of this could have been plenty enough but it was stretched to nearly 50 minutes. The viewer not only gets bored with this but loses interest in the proceedings.

RD was at the helm of music. There were only a few songs in the film but all of them became very popular. I am uploading all these and a few instrumentals in two back-to-back posts.

Here are the songs in the first post…
swarapriya
Instrumentals of "Heera Panna (1973)"...

Here is a version song and a few instrumentals of the songs from the film...
swarapriya
(Rajinder Krishan) Johny Mera Naam (1970)

I am uploading songs from this on request skipping the usual chronological order...

Years ago when I first saw this movie I thoroughly enjoyed it. It was remade into all southern languages and all enjoyed success. Vijay Anand (Goldie), who wrote its screenplay, edited it, and directed the film made many fine, enjoyable, and noteworthy films. He gave Dev who was going through a lean period of flops, whose last hit was “Jewel Thief (1967)”, also directed by Goldie, a chance to rejuvenate his career which it did.

However, watching this film now I have a different opinion about it. It may be Goldie’s weakest outing as screenplay looked hodgy-podgy (by the way he won the Filmfare Award for it), direction very patchy, and some characters like Prem Nath’s was so routine one can tell immediately his next move. There was no element of surprise there, one of the trademarks of Goldie’s movies.

Only thing I have not changed my opinion about the film is about its great music by the duo Kalyanji & Anandji. All songs are fun to listen to. Especially Kishoreda’s songs “Nafrat Karne” and “Pal Bhar” are a joy to listen to. Lataji had two melodious songs, “Govinda Bolo” and “O Baabul”. My favorite of the album is “O Baabul”.

I am uploading these and other songs from this film and a few instrumentals in two back-to-back posts. Here are the songs in the first post…
swarapriya
Instrumentals of "Johny Mera Naam (1970)"...

Here are a few instrumentals of the hit songs from the film...
swarapriya
(Anand Bakshi) Shareef Badmash (1973)

I am uploading these songs to accommodate a request by skipping the usual chronological order that I was following for this thread...

Dev went back to his old friend Raj Khosla to direct this film. With a desire to become a singer Raj came to Mumbai but found it was hard going for him. He befriended Dev who introduced him to Guru Dutt. As an assistant to Guru for some of his early films, Khoslaji learned the ropes to make good movies. When he turned as a director, Raj’s first five films starred Dev as the hero. These were “Milap (1955)”, “C.I.D. (1956)”, “Solva Saal (1958)”, “Kalapani (1958)”, and “Bombai Ka Babu (1960)”.

This movie had familiar premise for its story. Routinely predictable situations did not help. Part of the blame is how the screenplay was written. Surprisingly Khosla, who was responsible for so many winners before this, simply falters here. It is almost as if he was disinterested in the proceedings. Clearly his heart was not in it.

Dev seemed like was desperately trying to create the magic of his 1970 super hit “Johny Mera Naam”. But that magic was not there. Dev was popular making fashion statements with his films. In the first third of the movie he wore a lady’s pink hat that looked not only silly but also ridiculous on him. Hema also seemed like holding back. This was evident more in her dance number scene with Helen. Whereas Helen was nimble footed and charming Hema seemed ill at ease. There is no question about her dancing abilities that were already established and proved time and again. She is trained and is an accomplished dancer and used it as a ticket to establish herself in the Hindi filmdom. But her performance as a dancer somehow did not come through in this sequence with Helen. Shatrughan Sinha, appeared still dope eyed as in many of his early films, made a brief cameo appearance.

The usually reliable RD was the composer and unfortunately he was with the rest of the cast. Only few songs, five to be exact, but none except for one are anything to mention. Even that one song, “Main Nikal Jaaoonga”, it seems like was inspired by LP’s composition “Vaada Tera Vaada” from the 1972 hit “Dushman”. Incidentally Bakshi Saab wrote lyrics for that song also. Both were sung by Kishoreda. Nevertheless this song is a sheer pleasure to listen to. Kishoreda seemed to be best with these type of songs. I am also uploading part 2 of this song that is actually totally contained in the first song. It seemed like this part sounded even more exhilarating to listen to.

Incidentally this was the third film Dev was paired with Hema during 1973. These include “Chhupa Rustam”, “Joshila”, and this movie.

I am uploading above mentioned and other songs plus a few music clips in two back-to-back posts. Here are the songs in the first post…
swarapriya
A Few Music Clips from "Shareef Badmash (1973)"...

Here are a few music clips from the film...
swarapriya
(Rajinder Krishan) Banarasi Babu (1973)

I am uploading these songs skipping chronological order to cater for a request...

Shankar Mukherjee, who directed this film, made his debut with “Baarish” in 1957. It was not a super hit but was a modest success. Encouraged, he directed another seven films all starring Dev except for his last outing the 1975 “Faraar” with Amitabh. However, success eluded him with the exception of the 1962 film “Baat Ek Raat Ki” which was also only a modest hit.

For this movie Mukherjee clearly was somewhat inspired by what Goldie has done with 1970’s “Johny Mera Naam”. In “Johnny” I.S. Johar played three brothers, triplets. In this film, he acts as three separate people with the same names as in “Johny”. Dev has another person looking exactly like him, the secret, which probably is not much of a secret, is revealed at the end of the film. With Dev in double role, there is hardly any screen time for other people. Even the talent of the ever so beautiful Raakhee is completely wasted in a forgettable miniscule role with no scope.

The music duo which partially was responsible for “Johny’s” success were composers for the songs of this film. They are not bad and hummable for once or twice but then easily forgotten.

The title song appeared twice in the film. First time Kishoreda started the song but was interrupted by Asha’s “Kamar Meri”. I am uploading this song as it appeared in the movie. Also, in the movie there is a briefer version of the song “Mere Peechhe” by Lata. I am also uploading it here.

Here are these and the rest of the songs from the film…
swarapriya
(Anand Bakshi) The Train (1970)

Sometimes it is difficult to comprehend why a crummy film becomes such a commercial success. Except for a few good songs, this movie has nothing new or novel to offer. The story is a routine affair. The screenplay is wishy washy. Characters are insipid caricatures. Direction is incohesive. Enough said.

I am uploading all songs, several music clips, and a few instrumentals in three back-to-back posts. Here are the songs in the first post…
swarapriya
A Few Music Clips from "The Train (1970)"...

Here are a few music clips from this film...
swarapriya
Few Instrumentals of the Songs from "The Train (1970)"...

Here are a few instrumentals of the songs from the film...
swarapriya
(Hasrat Jaipuri) Gaban (1966)

This movie was co-directed by Hrishida from Munshi Premchandji’s classic novel “Gaban”. It has a stellar cast. It boasts music by the incomparable duo of S&J. Yet this movie does not belong to the classic genre as the novel was. It was not a bad movie but leaves a lot to be desired. Your expectations go unsatisfied. In the end it leaves you disappointed because you are undecided about whether you liked it or not.

The movie rightfully concentrates on Sunil Dutt’s character. I wish the director spent some more time on developing Sadhana’s character because as the story unfolded she had a bigger role to play.

There are a few good songs in the film. S&J cleverly copied the tune of the song “Maine Dekha” sung by Lata and written by Jaipuri Saab and used it later on in the 1968 hit film “Kanyadan” for the song “Mil Gaye”. It also was sung by Lata and its lyrics were also written by Jaipuri Saab.

S&J once again were ably assisted by Sebastian & Dattaram for this film.

Here are the songs…
soumik

Dear Swarapriya,

Thanks for this album.....

The voice in the song Kya Zindagi Cut Jayegi is not definitely of KK....I am 100% sure. If you listen carefully, the pitch doesn't match with KK whose pitch is very high.

Most probably the voice is of R.D.Burman himself.

Soumik


QUOTE(swarapriya @ Aug 23 2018, 06:09 PM) *

(Anand Bakshi) Heera Panna (1973)

I am uploading these songs to accommodate a request by skipping the usual chronological order that I was following for this thread...

Dev Anand followed his hit film of 1971 “Hare Rama Hare Krishna” with this movie, “Heera Panna”. Like the “Krishna” movie, he wrote the story for this film, produced and directed it, also acted in it. He took Zeenat from that film as the principal lead for this film.

When the movie was released, everyone talked about Zeenat and her bikini draped body but the one who stole the show was Raakhee. Raakhee was simply stunning to look at. She was beautifully clad in sarees that accentuated her grace and was lovely to look at. A beautiful woman she is, Raakhee was director’s and photographer’s delight and they were very careful in choosing her shots.

This movie was a modest success. It would have been another great one if only Dev kept it going as he did the first two-thirds. It was a delightful ride. Execution by the director was just about perfect. Then suddenly everything is jumbled up. In the last one-third of the movie all mayhem gets loose with umpteen number of villains pursuing the hero to snatch the stolen diamond from him. 10 or 15 minutes of this could have been plenty enough but it was stretched to nearly 50 minutes. The viewer not only gets bored with this but loses interest in the proceedings.

RD was at the helm of music. There were only a few songs in the film but all of them became very popular. I am uploading all these and a few instrumentals in two back-to-back posts.

Here are the songs in the first post…

swarapriya
QUOTE(soumik @ Sep 13 2018, 01:50 AM) *

Dear Swarapriya,

Thanks for this album.....

The voice in the song Kya Zindagi Cut Jayegi is not definitely of KK....I am 100% sure. If you listen carefully, the pitch doesn't match with KK whose pitch is very high.

Most probably the voice is of R.D.Burman himself.

Soumik






You may be right. Thanks for the observation. Cheers.

swarapriya
(Majrooh) Wapas (1969)

The 1964 award winning team of the film “Dosti”, director Satyen Bose, Music duo L&P, and the lyricist Majrooh Saab are back together again for this film. I am not sure how the film is as no DVD is available to watch. Except for the beautifully rendered classical song by the incomparable Rafi Saab, “Panjaniya”, this album gets a score of B–.

Here are the songs from this film…
swarapriya
(Rajinder Krishan) Pyar Kiye Jaa (1966)

The writer, producer and director of heavy drama films like "Nazrana (1961)" and "Dil Ek Mandir (1963)" changed his hat and came up with this light-hearted out-and out comedy film. It was based on his original Tamil hit "Kadhalikka Neramillai (1964)". Almost scene for scene of the Hindi film was taken from the Tamil version.

The highlight of the film was its beautiful music and a great performance by Mahmood. In particular, there is a scene between Mahmood and Om Prakash that at once was hilariously rip roaring, even though it was an exact copy from the Tamil film. Both Mahmood and Prakashji were nominated for the Filmfare Best Comedy Actor Award for their respective roles. Mahmood Saab walked away with it courteously acknowledging that it was only possible because Omji was so much great to work and interact with.

Kishoreda looked his age in this film especially romancing a younger woman, Kalpana. Rajashree, the actress from south, who appeared in the original Tamil and its remake in Telugu, was reprising her role for the third time. Unfortunately she did not look a good match for Shashi. One of the main problems was there seems to be excessive makeup used on her. Also she applied heavy lipstick that also was not appealing. Kalpana had very little to do in the film. In a brief role, Mumtaz not only looks slim and trim, but very attractive making her a good comedic partner for Mahmood.

There are some good songs in the film even though almost all of them became popular. My favorite is the duet “Kisne Pukaara”.

I am uploading this and other songs from this film in two back-to-back posts. Here is the first set of songs...
swarapriya
Concluding Songs from "Pyar Kiye Jaa (1966)"...

Here are the rest of the songs from this film...

swarapriya
(Shailendra) Sanjh aur Savera (1964)

I have uploaded songs from this film recently in this very thread. They are available starting at the following location...

http://www.hamaraforums.com/index.php?show...mp;#entry752436



swarapriya
(Anand Bakshi) Pyar ki Kahani (1971)

This film was a remake of the Tamil hit “Kai Koduttha Dheivam”. The Tamil film was also remade in every South Indian language. For Hindi film originally producers wanted Jeetendra to star. But during the time it was made, the film industry had self-imposed limit restricting actors not to star in more than six films at one time. Thus the lead went to Amitabh, who was just turning his career around and looking to leapfrog to fame and fortune and become a legend in the Hindi film industry.

This film in Hindi also was made by producers from south. The family drama was only a moderate success but was not that bad. The major highlight of the film was Tanuja’s brilliant performance as an innocent and childlike woman.

Music by RD was okay. Both solos by Rafi Saab and one by Kishoreda standout.

Here are the songs from the film…
swarapriya
(Hasrat Jaipuri) Love in Tokyo (1966)

Here is a movie with only pretext of entertaining audience. That it did in spite of Mahmood’s repetitive antics that we have seen in many other previous films. It also proved once again that how an actor like Joy Mukherjee with so little talent to offer can get away because of other embellishments in the movie. Movie overcame all these shortcomings splendidly because it was eye-catchingly photographed. And as the leading pair romp through the streets of Tokyo several catchy tunes roll by thanks to the genius of S&J and lyricists Jaipuri Saab and Shailendraji.

The movie boasted one after another hit song. The hit parade commenced as soon as the hero landed in Tokyo and continued non-stop through until the end of the movie. There is a song beautifully performed by Rafi Saab that is as intoxicating as its choice words, “Aa Jaa Re Aa”. There is another romantic ghazal sung both by Lataji and Rafi Saab, separately, “O Mere Shaah-E-Khubaan”. Here is a note about Lataji’s version. Almost all CDs published it as a solo. However in the movie it started with Rafi Saab singing a few words then Lataji taking over. I am uploading both the CD as well as the movie versions here. Also, one of Lataji’s beautiful song, “Mujhe Tum”, is from this film. It has marvelous lyrics by Jaipuri Saab and Lataji performed it magnificently. This everlasting beauty is one of my favorites.

Dattaram and Sebastian were assistant music directors.

I am uploading all songs from the film, a couple of version songs by Sonu Nigam, and a few instrumentals in three back-to-back posts.

Here are the songs in the first post…
swarapriya
Concluding Songs from "Love in Tokyo (1966)"...

Here are the rest of the songs from this film...
swarapriya
Few Instrumentals of the Songs from "Love in Tokyo (1966)"...

Here are a few instrumentals of the songs from the film...
swarapriya
(Majrooh) Abhinetri (1970)

This movie justifies why Hema Malini was called a “Dream Girl” when she came into the Hindi film field. Throughout the film she was stunningly photographed. Apart from being an eye candy, Malini had an opportunity to display her dancing skills. In some dance sequences she was simply dazzling.

If not for Hema this would have been an easily forgettable movie. There are several lengthy songs in the film. The duet “Sa Re Ga Ma Pa” became very popular. My personal favorite is Lataji’s solo, “O Ghata Saanwari”.

I am uploading these and the rest of the songs from the film, plus a few instrumentals, in three back-to-back posts. Here are the songs in the first post…
swarapriya
Concluding Songs from "Abhinetri (1970)"...

Here are the rest of the songs from this film...
swarapriya
Few Instrumentals of the Songs from "Abhinetri (1970)"...

Here are a few instrumentals of the songs from the film...
swarapriya
(Rajinder Krishan) Sagaai (1966)

S.D. Narang who had surprising success with his 1964 film “Shehnai” put together some of the members from that film for “Sagaai”. Narang wrote, produced, and directed this film. Again lead pair was Rajshree and Biswajeet. Rajinder Krishan who wrote the lyrics for “Shehnai” also wrote songs for this film. Ravi, who gave hit music for “Shehnai”, was also the composer once again for “Sagaai” songs.

This time around the film completely belonged to Rajshree. Other characters come and go as bulk of the work revolves around Rajshree. Her character has to endure many heart breaking difficulties throughout life. The man she was engaged to loses his legs in an automobile accident before getting married. When her rich parents refuse to have her marry him, she walks away from her house to nourish her man back to health. She gets married to him in his helpless state. Then her younger brother suffers a car accident coming to see her so that she can tie a Rakhi on his hand. Her father-in-law’s complete forest estate including his house burns down to ashes in a fire. The list just goes on and on.

Amidst all this there was Rajendranath trying to dominate screen time with utterly nonsensical buffoonery. That left very little time for fine actors like Rehman to show their skills.

There are a few good songs in this film. Mahendra Kpoor’s both solos seem to have the same tunes used by Ravi in other films with Kapoor lending his voice. Yet they are fine to listen to.

Here are these and other songs from this film…
swarapriya
(Shailendra) Zindagi (1964)

Songs from this film were recently uploaded in this very thread. They are available starting at the following location...

http://www.hamaraforums.com/index.php?show...mp;#entry752480




swarapriya
(Anand Bakshi) Anokhee Pehchan (1972)

I have no clue about this movie. Neither I could locate a DVD nor a songs CD. The songs I am uploading here are all from various videos. Even though the audio quality of them is quite adequate, I have decided to upload all songs at a lower bit rate.

Here are the songs…
swarapriya
(Hasrat Jaipuri) Pyar Mohabbat (1966)

This film was the only pairing of Saira & Dev. It was produced and directed by Dev’s good friend Shankar Mukherjee. The movie has two distinct halves. The first half is extensively shot abroad in places like, Copenhagen, Egypt, Rome, and others. Most of the story happens aboard a cruise ship. The second half is shot in India with predictable twists and turns in the story. In between it is sprinkled with 10 songs composed by Shankar & Jaikishan.

Like the movie itself, the music is very inconsistent. There are some good songs and there are some bad songs. Dattaram was the assistant music director.

Saira who already has a shrilled voice keeps screaming and shouting and has many scenes with temper tantrums. Dev looked good and exhibits controlled acting.

I am uploading all songs from the film in two back-to-back posts. Here are the songs in the first post…
swarapriya
Concluding Songs from "Pyar Mohabbat (1966)"...

Here are the rest of the songs and a few music clips from the film...
swarapriya
(Majrooh) Dastak (1970)

This was noted Urdu writer Rajinder Singh Bedi’s maiden directorial venture. He also produced the film based on his own story, originally published in early 40s. Even though Bedi Saab directed only a handful of films, his recognized best work was as a multiple-award winning dialogue writer of several films of Bimal Roy and Hrishikesh Mukherjee.

The film also introduced Rehana Sultan in the lead. She was a graduate of the Film Institute and was the first one from the Institute to land a major role in Bombay Filmworld. She garnered the National Award for Best Actress for her brilliant performance. She also had another important film that very same year. 1970’s “Chetna” dealt with lives of prostitutes. This back-to-back art films projected a certain image of Rehana and she could never capture the imagination of filmmakers to offer her roles in the mainstream commercial films.

Sanjeev Kumar, who was the hero of the film, also won the honors of landing on the Nation Award for Best Actor. Kamal Bose, who was the cinematographer, won the National Award for the Best Black & White Photography. Hrishida, who was the editor of the film, won the Filmfare Award as the Best Editor.

Besides fine acting, and rich lyrics penned by Majrooh Saab, the film is best known for its unforgettable compositions. Every song from the film is a piece of gem. The treasure is in the listening pleasure of mastery of instruments used in these songs, especially a blend of various instruments such as veena, sitar, and gentle rhythm of tabla beats that create a lasting mesmerizing experience. The movie also won yet another National Award, a first for its music composer Madan Mohanji that he richly deserved.

There are only a few songs in the film. The song “Maai Ri” has a version by Mohanji himself. When he was ready to sit down and compose this song with Lataji lending her voice, he got a message stating that Lataji is ill and will not be able to attend her recording session. Then Madanji went ahead and sang the song himself to guide Lataji how he perceived it. Later on after Mohanji passed away some of CD collections honoring him included this song. I am uploading it in its entirety here.

A note about the ghazal from the film “Hum Hain Maata-E-Koocha”. This song was not written for the film. It came from one of Majrooh Saab’s published book of his ghazals. In some gathering Madanji heard Majrooh Saab recite this ghazal and decided to include it in the film. The original ghazal apparently is much longer than what we hear in the film. Out of 7 stanzas Madanji selected only three; 1, 3, and 7. There is a brief audio clip with Madanji singing beginning of this ghazal. It is available on his web site. Because of its poor quality, I am not uploading it here.

Here are all the songs and a few music clips from the film, in two back-to-back posts, starting with the next post, with Majroohji and Madanji collaborating and completely captivating your time…

swarapriya
Songs from "Dastak (1970)"

Here is the first set of songs from this beautiful album...
swarapriya
Concluding Songs from "Dastak (1970)"

Here are the rest of the songs and a few music clips from the film...
swarapriya
(Rajinder Krishan) Yeh Zindagi Kitni Haseen Hai (1966)

How to pair two great talents like Ashok Kumar and Motilal in the same film and see how to waste them on a senseless story badly put together, then this is the movie for you. It did not help that about one-third of the movie was shot abroad in France and Italy. And there are some good songs in the film that hardly mattered. The mindless concoction the director traverses us through the spineless yarn leaves one unhappy.

If you do not get enough of Saira Bano, then you are in for a treat. She has a double role in the film. Now it is a different matter that she and Joy Mukherjee have no histrionics to exhibit.

There is something curious about the song “Nange Baazoo”. In the DVD it had the words “Nange Baazoo Nangi Tangey” whereas in the CD it is “Nange Baazoo Nangi Raney”. I am not sure why there is such discrepancy.

I am uploading this and other songs from this film in two back-to-back posts. Here are the songs in the first post…
swarapriya
Concluding Songs from "Yeh Zindagi Kitni Haseen Hai (1966)"...

Here are the rest of the songs from this film...
swarapriya
(Shailendra) Chand aur Suraj (1965)

This movie deals with the bond between two brothers. While the movie started promisingly, it becomes a boringly predictable family drama. Here are all the songs from the film…
swarapriya
(Anand Bakshi) Anuraag (1972)

Shakti Samanta has produced or directed nearly 60 films. Some of these were super hits and some were modest successes. Since 1969’s “Aradhana” he made a string of super successful movies. Then in 1972, he hit upon this simple story idea that he was intending to make it into a film. But he was not convinced that people will buy into this, so he almost abandoned the idea. When Rajesh Khanna, who admired Shakti because he was the one who made him a superstar, heard about this he persuaded Samanta to go ahead with the project. He volunteered to star as a guest. He even financed it for distribution along with Shakti’s home production.

I am glad to see that good senses prevailed. When the movie was released, it was not a raging hit. Yet it garnered enough viewership to enjoy modest success. In my opinion, this probably was the best outing for Samantaji. His storytelling starts like a gentle breeze in the morning and continues through until an unexpected storm wreaks havoc by the evening leaving audience drenched. The predictability of the ending did not take away from the deftness with Shaktiji handled the situation.

Samanta was working here with veterans like Nutan and Dadamoni, and up and coming Vindod Mehra. He introduced Moushmi in her first Hindi role as the heroine. But this was out and out Dadamoni’s picture. Great Ashok Kumar was simply brilliant in his role displaying histrionics fit only a thespian like himself is capable of performing. To go along with this another great outing for Burmanda’s song compositions. Every song proved to be a hit with Lataji dominating. Bakshi Saab’s lyrics lifted the songs to even greater heights.

The song “Mera Raaja Beta” appeared three times in the film. The second one was an abbreviated version of the first. The third one was completely different. My favorite of the album is Lataji’s melodious rendering of the song “Sunn Ri Pawan”. I am uploading these and other songs and a few music clips in two back-to-back posts. Here are the songs in the first post…
swarapriya
Concluding Songs from "Anuraag (1972)"...

Here are the rest of the songs and a few music clips from this beautiful album...
swarapriya
(Hasrat Jaipuri) Street Singer (1966)

Veteran actor Chandrashekhar wrote its story, screenplay, dialogues besides producing and directing it. Apart from all this, he was also the hero of the film. Earlier in 1964, he made “Cha Cha Cha” with all of the same responsibilities. That movie was a hit. This movie was not as big a hit as ‘Cha Cha Cha” was. Yet it enjoyed modest run.

Clearly Shekharji was influenced by Elvis Presley. In this movie he turns, twists, bends, jumps, shakes, and dances. He is no Presley, but does a pretty good job of it.

The music was supposed to be given by one Suraj, who the titles and posters claim was an assistant of Shankar & Jaikishan. As far as I know, Dattaram & Sebastian were the only two assistant music directors to S&J. This was true for every movie S&J composed music for. I cannot recall in any of these films one Suraj being their assistant. With Sharda singing all of the female songs in the film, I wonder whether this Suraj was no other than Shankar, who for God knows what reasons, big on her. Irrespective of who it was, one thing is for sure. Being a musical with lots of dances and Rafi Saab lending his voice the movie keeps one engaged.

There are quite a few songs in the film, most of them are longer in duration. It also has several dance numbers. Unfortunately except for a few, these songs are not easily available. The VCD I watched the movie had not only bad picture but also terrible audio. Because of this I am uploading the songs at a lower bit rate. Some (3 to be exact) of the songs came from various CD collections. They are fine to listen to. But for uniformity sake, I am uploading all songs at the same lower bit rate.

I am uploading all these songs in two back-to-back posts. Here are the songs in the first post…
swarapriya
Concluding Songs from "Street Singer (1966)"...

Here are the rest of the songs from this film...
Viraj Padhye
QUOTE(swarapriya @ Oct 24 2018, 05:59 PM) *

(Hasrat Jaipuri) Street Singer (1966)

Veteran actor Chandrashekhar wrote its story, screenplay, dialogues besides producing and directing it. Apart from all this, he was also the hero of the film. Earlier in 1964, he made “Cha Cha Cha” with all of the same responsibilities. That movie was a hit. This movie was not as big a hit as ‘Cha Cha Cha” was. Yet it enjoyed modest run.

Clearly Shekharji was influenced by Elvis Presley. In this movie he turns, twists, bends, jumps, shakes, and dances. He is no Presley, but does a pretty good job of it.

The music was supposed to be given by one Suraj, who the titles and posters claim was an assistant of Shankar & Jaikishan. As far as I know, Dattaram & Sebastian were the only two assistant music directors to S&J. This was true for every movie S&J composed music for. I cannot recall in any of these films one Suraj being their assistant. With Sharda singing all of the female songs in the film, I wonder whether this Suraj was no other than Shankar, who for God knows what reasons, big on her. Irrespective of who it was, one thing is for sure. Being a musical with lots of dances and Rafi Saab lending his voice the movie keeps one engaged.

There are quite a few songs in the film, most of them are longer in duration. It also has several dance numbers. Unfortunately except for a few, these songs are not easily available. The VCD I watched the movie had not only bad picture but also terrible audio. Because of this I am uploading the songs at a lower bit rate. Some (3 to be exact) of the songs came from various CD collections. They are fine to listen to. But for uniformity sake, I am uploading all songs at the same lower bit rate.

I am uploading all these songs in two back-to-back posts. Here are the songs in the first post…

Suraj is none other than Shankar. He also gave music to Marathi movie "Ti mi navhech" with same name.
swarapriya
QUOTE(Viraj Padhye @ Oct 24 2018, 07:13 PM) *


(Hasrat Jaipuri) Street Singer (1966)

Suraj is none other than Shankar. He also gave music to Marathi movie "Ti mi navhech" with same name.



Thanks for the information, Viraj. I wonder why he used a different name and why movie titles and posters falsely claim that Suraj was an assistant to S&J.

Cheers,
Swarapriya


swarapriya
(Majrooh) Ehsan (1970)

I will skip my review of this film because watching it there was not a single thing I felt good about it. Here are the songs…
Viraj Padhye
QUOTE(swarapriya @ Oct 26 2018, 11:40 AM) *

QUOTE(Viraj Padhye @ Oct 24 2018, 07:13 PM) *


(Hasrat Jaipuri) Street Singer (1966)

Suraj is none other than Shankar. He also gave music to Marathi movie "Ti mi navhech" with same name.



Thanks for the information, Viraj. I wonder why he used a different name and why movie titles and posters falsely claim that Suraj was an assistant to S&J.

Cheers,
Swarapriya

It is either income tax or they were bound by some contract so couldn't use their real name.

Viraj
swarapriya
(Rajinder Krishan) Mehrban (1967)

This movie was based on AVM’s 1960 hit “Padikkadha Medhai”. The Tamil film itself was based on the 1953 Bengali film “Jog Biyog”. The Tamil version was successfully remade into other South Indian languages. It was only a matter of time that a Hindi version will emerge. This 1967 film “Mehrban” was the answer.

Like most other movies made in south during this period it was a family drama. The movie belonged to Ashok Kumar and Sunil Dutt. Nutan had an insignificant role. Mahmood’s role was completely unnecessary as his comedy antics were very pale.

The movie was bolstered by excellent performances from Dadamoni and Dutt Saab. But it was Ravi’s music that stood out with few very good songs. Rafi Saab’s solo “Aye Mere Dost” had his voice imprint with its multiple modulations stamped all over it. By the way, this song has the shades of “Kal Chaman Tha” from the 1965 film “Khandan”. Interestingly both songs were written by Rajinder Krishanji and were composed by Ravi.

My favorite of the album is Asha’s solo “Saawan Ki Raat”. This semi classical song as sung by Ashaji is simply riveting.

Here are these songs and others from this film…
swarapriya
(Shailendra) Chhoti Chhoti Baten (1965)

This was late great character actor Motilal’s labor of love. He wrote its story, produced it, and directed the film besides acting in it. After finishing the movie he died before it was released. It won the National Awards as the third Best Feature film and fetched Motilal the Best Writer Award. These awards came posthumously.

The movie was a character study of people you live, work, and interact with. Hardworking all his life, barely able to meet family and debt demands, the principal character portrayed by Motilal finds one fine morning himself inheriting a great fortune. He fulfills all wishes of his family and embarks on a journey to find a safe haven where he can settle down in peace. He temporarily finds peace in a small remote village only to discover that what he is looking for cannot be found.

The music for the film was composed by Anil Biswas. By strange coincidence this was also his last film before his retirement. Biswasji lived until 2003, but after this 1965 film he never worked on any other film. There are several great songs in this film. There is a story behind the song “Zindagi Khwaab Hai”. When Motilalji passed away, lyricist Shailendraji wrote this song as a tribute. In Raj Kapoor’s 1956 masterpiece “Jagte Raho”, Motilal’s character has a song that started with the exact same wording. It was also written by Shailendraji. The tribute song was to be included in this film as a background song. However I found that in the film I saw it was missing. Incidentally both songs were sang by Mukeshji, who was related to Motilalji. It was Motilalji who brought Mukeshji to Mumbai and introduced him to the Hindi film world.

Here is this and other songs from this film…

swarapriya
(Anand Bakshi) Apna Desh (1972)

This movie was a remake of the 1969 Telugu film hit “Kathanayakudu”. It was also made in Tamil and Kannada. The movie about bad people or politicians appearing to be good may have been a novel thing when this movie was made. After these many years the subject matter now seem to be somewhat dated even though it is still very relevant.

This is a watchable movie thanks to several good performances. Rajesh Khanna looked slim and trim and was disarmingly good. He was paired with Mumtaz who as usual was very appealing. But it was Om Prakash who nearly stole the show in the role of a vicious wolf disguised as a god loving and charitable “lamb” of a person.

I read that the little nephew of Rajesh Khanna in the film actually was Sridevi as a child artiste. This must be some mistake. The “boy” has no resemblance to Sridevi what so ever.

RD’s music proved to be a big asset for the film. My personal best is the song “Kajra Laga Ke”. The tune and the way the song was molded appeared to me borrowed by RD from his dad’s 1971 hit song “Hey Maine Qasam Lee” from “Tere Mere Sapne”. That song was done by Lataji and Kishoreda, as is this song. A note about the part 2 of “Sunn Champa”. It is a one-line song, not different from the part 1 of the song. The only difference is that the part 2 version is preceded by some music.

I am uploading these and other songs from the film and a few instrumentals in three back-to-back posts. Here are the songs in the first post…
swarapriya
Concluding Songs from "Apna Desh (1972)"...

Here are rest of the songs from this popular album...
swarapriya
Instrumentals of Songs from "Apna Desh (1972)"...

Here are a few instrumentals of the songs from this film...
swarapriya
(Hasrat Jaipuri) Suraj (1966) - Post 1 - Songs from the Film

This lackluster routine period drama had two things going for it. There are a few spectacular dazzling dances by its beautiful heroine, Vyjayanthi Mala. The other thing is the great music by the bubbly and effervescent music director duo Shankar & Jaikishan. The movie became a huge hit thanks to them.

Mumtaz appeared in yet another insignificant role as a companion to the princess. Her turn to explode as an actress to reckon with is still a few years away but she was destined to make her mark. The movie could have made crispier by eliminating worthless comedy involving Johnny Walker, Agha, and Mukri. Their antics dominated much of the screen time and yet their scenes were not even funny.

All songs from the film became hugely popular. This was the movie in which S&J introduced Sharda as a singer. She had two solos and both of them were hits.

There are three songs from this film that are my favorites. One is Rafi Saab’s duet with Asha, “Kaise Samjhaaoon” and the other two are Rafi Saab’s solos “Bahaaro” and “Chehre Pe”. Of these three “Bahaaro” is such a great pleasure. I just do not get enough by tirelessly listening to this over and over again. God Bless Your Soul, Rafi Saab!

“Bahaaro” probably is one of the best romantic songs written, composed, and sang. Filmfare Awards were given to Hasrat Jaipuri for its rich lyrics and to Rafi Saab for so deliciously singing the song. S&J grabbed yet another Filmfare Award as the Music Directors of the film. They were assisted by Dattaram & Sebastian.

The song “Bahaaro” has been a perennial favorite with all the budding musicians. It was literally played by hundreds of instrumentalists using various instruments. I am uploading several of these here.

I am uploading all songs from the film, a couple of specials, and a whole bunch of instrumentals in six back-to-back posts. Here are the songs in the first post…
This is a "lo-fi" version of our main content. To view the full version with more information, formatting and images, please click here.
Invision Power Board © 2001-2021 Invision Power Services, Inc.