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surhall
sangeet ka safar

very good and best post this songs
dhall
swarapriya
QUOTE(surhall @ Jan 8 2017, 07:54 AM) *

sangeet ka safar

very good and best post this songs
dhall


Thank you kindly Dhallji. Cheers.

swarapriya
(Rajinder Krishan) Aasha (1957)

Part of the following write up apeared before. I am re-uploading these songs on request...

M.V. Raman who introduced Vyjayanti Mala in Tamil, Telugu, and Hindi films, edited, produced, and directed this film, “Aasha” that starred Mala with Kishoreda. Raman directed eight Hindi films. Kishoreda was in seven of them. These films include “Bahar (1951)”,”Ladki (1953)”,”Pehli Jhalak (1955)”, “Bhai-Bhai (1956)”, “Aasha (1957)”, “Chandan (1958)”, and “Payal ki Jhankar (1968)”. Incidentally, Asha Parekh made a brief appearance (limited to two scenes) in “Aasha” and was credited simply as Asha. This was before her stardom in the 1959 hit film “Dil Deke Dekho”. Asha is also in another of Raman productions, “Jwala”, which starred Madhubala. That film even though started in the late 50’s, did not see completion until 1971. This was mainly due to Madhubala’s prolonged illness that led to her untimely death. Madhubala’s sister, Chanchal, posed as her double to finish the film.

“Aasha”, which was shot partly in color, became a hit mainly because of the songs in it, especially the song “Eena Meena Deeka”, that is popular even today. This was one of the first Rock N Roll songs to hit an Indian screen and it became an overnight rage. It has three versions in the film, two by Asha Bhosle and one by Kishoreda.

The origins of the song “Eena Meena Deeka” make a fascinating reading. Apparently the beginning of the song was inspired by some kids who were playing outside Ramchandra’s home. They were playing a game chanting “Eenie Meenie Minie Moe”. Collaborating with his assistant John Gomes, Ramchandra came up with the word “Eena Meena Deeka, Daai Dame Nika”. Gomes was a Goan. Goan musicians in the Hindi film industry were famous for creating rhythmic sounds for songs. Gomes spoke Konknani and came up with the next set of words, “Maaka Naaka Naaka” (meaning “I don’t want”). Thus the beginnings of a hit song started.

Here is another interesting note. In his 1980 film “Karz” its director Subhash Ghai used a similar ploy that was employed in this film to nab the culprit by enacting a play in the end depicting true incidents.

I am uploading all versions of this fun song and the rest plus a few instrumentals in three back-to-back posts. Here are the songs in the first post…
swarapriya
Concluding Songs from "Aasha (1957)"...

Here are the rest of the songs from this fine album...
swarapriya
Few Instrumentals of the Song "Eena Meena" from "Aasha (1957)"...

Here are a few instrumentals of the song "Eena Meena Deeka" from the film...
swarapriya
(Shailendra) Parivar (1956)

I am re-uploading the following songs from this film on request...
swarapriya
(Anand Bakshi) Mere Humsafar (1970)

This movie started nicely in a small village in a beautiful mountainous setting. But when the leading pair moved to Mumbai it descends to a traditional and run-of-the-mill and forgettable yarn. The saving grace of the film was its fine music by Kalyanji & Anandji. Bakshi Saab came up with fine lyrics. My favorite of the album is the duet by Lataji and Mukeshji. Great song, beautifully done.

Here is this song and the rest…
swarapriya
(Hasrat) Tere Ghar Ke Samne (1963)

This hit musical comedy was directed by Dev’s younger brother Vijay Anand (Goldie). Goldie also wrote its story and screenplay. He also had a cameo in the film. This probably was one of his underrated films.

This movie starred for the last time together the handsome pair of Nutan and Dev. Dev was dashing and with his debonair looks simply steals your heart.

But the real deal of this movie is its ever so youthful and exuberant music composed by Burmanda. Every song became a huge hit and they have not lost their appeal or luster even after nearly 54 years. RD was his assistant.

My favorite song of the album is “Dil Ka Bhanwra”. Rafi Saab was at his romantic best matching the ease of Dev’s charm for this song. It was beautifully picturized while climbing down from the top of Qutub Minar.

Incidentally, part of the music from the song "Ye Tanhaai" appears in Burmanda's hit musical film "Ziddi (1964)” in the song "Raat Ka Sama". Also, the song “Dil Ka Bhanwra” has shades of Burmanda’s earlier hit “Deewaana Mastaana” from 1960 “Bombai ka Babu”.

This was the first of the two films Jaipuri Saab worked with Burmanda. His second film was “Ziddi”. It is a pity that they were not able to work together in more films.

I am uploading songs from this film, a few specials, and a few instrumentals in three back-to-back posts. Here is the first set of songs...
swarapriya
Concluding Songs from "Tere Ghar Ke Samne (1963)"...

Here are the rest of the songs from this beautiful musical and a few version songs...
swarapriya
A Few Instrumentals of Songs From "Tere Ghar Ke Samne (1963)"...

Here are a few instrumentals of the songs from this film...
swarapriya
(Majrooh) Chalti ka Naam Gaadi (1958)

I am re-uploading these songs on request...

I do not understand how the tax related economics work but apparently Kishoreda to avoid huge amounts he owed in income taxes made a couple of movies, one in Bengali and the other in Hindi, hoping that they will flop. The Bengali version, “Lookochuri”, starring Kishoreda opposite Mala Sinha with Hemantda’s music made in 1958, instead clicked in a big way and became a hit. He also made in the same year, 1958, the Hindi film, “Chalti ka Naam Gaadi”. As luck would have it, the Hindi film also was a huge hit.

A disgusted Kishoreda ceded all his rights to the movie, “Gaadi”, by gifting them to his secretary friend, Anoop Sharma. Kishoreda and his problem with income tax officers persisted till his death.

Aloke Dasgupta was the cameraman of the “Gaadi”. He was only 23 years old when he was put in charge by Kishoreda to photograph the movie. Dasgupta also played another important role. As Kishoreda’s romance with Madhubala started progressing, he became the couple’s confidante.

Kishoreda originally signed Kamal Mazumdar to direct both “Lookochuri” and “Gaadi”. But Mazumdar became nervous on the first day of the shoot of the “Gaadi” movie. Directing three brothers he felt was a daunting task and decided not to proceed. Satyen Bose was a friend of Kishoreda who directed him and Ashok in their previous movie together, “Bandi (1957)”. At Kishore’s request, Bose came in to direct the first scene even before knowing what he was getting into.

Satyen Bose was not happy with the choice of the cameraman because of Aloke’s lack of experience. The picturization of “Ek Ladki” was a test case for Aloke. After the shooting of the song was completed, Bose was happy with the results, and Aloke stayed as the cameraman.

When the movie was released it became a huge hit. Its songs became a rage. The duet, “Haal Kaisa Hai”, went on to adorn Binaca Geetmala’s weekly top of the charts for more than a year. My own favorite is Kishoreda’s solo “Ek Ladki”. Apparently the song was inspired by Tennessee Ernie’s English song from his album “16 Tons”. Both Jaidev and RD were assistants to SD.

I am uploading songs from this album in three back-to-back posts. The first post contains all of the songs from the film. The second post contains some specials. The third post contains some of the instrumentals of some of the popular songs from the film. These start beginning in the next post…
swarapriya
A Few Specials of the Songs from "Chalti ka Naam Gaadi (1958)"...

Here are the title music and a few specials of the songs from the film...
swarapriya
Few Instrumentals of "Chalti ka Naam Gaadi (1958)"...

Here are a few instrumentals of the songs from this fine popular musical film...
ketaki shukla
Thanks Swarapriya for this lovely album

Ketaki
swarapriya
QUOTE(ketaki shukla @ Jan 20 2017, 03:25 PM) *

Thanks Swarapriya for this lovely album

Ketaki


Thanks Ketaki. Cheers.


swarapriya
(Rajinder Krishan) Bombay Ka Chor (1962)

It seems like many of the movies made in late 50’ and early 60’s started with a lot of promise but ended up as a routine crime thriller. Take for example this film. It starts out as a comedy with too many antics by venerable Kishoreda sprinkled with some fine songs. Then midway through it degenerates into a mindless crime thriller.

Rafi and Rajinder Krishan do their best with the help of fine singing by Asha and Kishoreda. The result is that there are several catchy songs in the film. Kishoreda’s “Hasrat Hi Rahi” is the song to be remembered for ages. Beautifully sung to the fine composition by Ravi Saab to memorable and touching lyrics by Krishanji. Talking about touching lyrics, Rafi Saab had only one song in the film, “Hai Bahaar-E-Baagh-E-Duniya”, but it is a heart warming winner. Ashaji contributed several beautiful solos. “Halki Halki Sard Hawa” is a standout. It is followed by another winner “Kaun Aaya”.

The fim has nearly 14 minutes of ice skating. This was performed by the American troupe with their famous show called “Holiday On Ice”. Even today, that is a popular show in USA. Asha has two songs with no one particularly singing as a background to skating. These songs are “Kaun Aaya” and “Husn Ki Dekhiye”.

I am uploading all songs from this fine album in two back-to-back posts. Here is the first set of songs…
swarapriya
Concluding Songs from "Bombay Ka Chor (1962)"...

Here are the rest of the songs from this beautiful album...
swarapriya
(Shailendra) Half Ticket (1962)

This zany comedy which paired the husband & wife team of Kishoreda and Madhubala was inspired by the Jerry Lewis & Dean Martin Hollywood English comedy hit "You're Never Too Young" that was released in 1955. That film itself was a remake of Billy Wilder’s first directorial film in Hollywood, “The Major and The Minor”, released in 1942. That film is now considered a classic comedy. Unfortunately “Half Ticket” does not live up to neither one of the English films. Kishoreda’s whole movie is a non-stop one antic after another and it finally gets on your nerves.

One of the highlights of the film is a song by Kishoreda changing his voice to female vocals. The song "Aa Ke Seedhi Lagi", per Salilda, was originally to be sung by Lataji. For some reason Lataji could not make it to the recording session. Kishoreda immediately volunteered to sing the female portion himself. Before Salilda could make up his mind, the incredibly talented Kishoreji started singing the female portion. A brief introduction of this is included in the special version of this song that I am also posting here.

I am uploading the two songs mentioned and others in two back-to-back posts. Here are the songs in the first post…
swarapriya
Concluding Songs from "Half Ticket (1962)"...

Here are the rest of the songs from this movie...
swarapriya
(Anand Bakshi) My Love (1970)

This movie again deals with the familiar love story that was told umpteen times before. The only difference this time is that the setting of the movie is changed from India to East Africa. Also, we have seldom used music director, Daan Singh (see his attached picture below) at the helm of music.

Singhji for most of his life worked in Jaipur for AIR. He tried his luck as a music director but was not able to make a career in Mumbai film world. This film “My Love” was his second film. He had few more films for which he composed music but they were not released. For example, the 1973 film “Bhool Na Jaana” (couple of songs sung by Mukeshji were “Pukaaro Mera Naam Le Kar” and “Gham-E-Dil Kis Se Kahoon”).

Mukeshji was his favorite singer. His two songs from “My Love”, “Woh Tere Pyaar Ka Gham” and “Zikr Hota Hai” were chartbusters. Especially the song “Woh Tere Pyaar”. Apparently this was one of Mukeshji’s favorite. Rafi Saab’s title song “Yeh Tumhaare Raaste” is another lovely song.

Singhji made use of the setting of the film to score beautiful background music. The East African music influence is not obvious in the songs he composed but most of them either were preceded or were trailed by that type of music. I am including several music clips to show how Daan Singh Saab was able to capture the African drum beats beautifully.

I am uploading all songs (in the first post) and several music clips (in the second post) in two back-to-back posts. A note about the audio quality of the songs. Most of the songs are in very good quality. But in a few of them the quality of the voices suffers as it becomes a tad feeble for few seconds but then corrects itself.

Here are the songs in the first post…
swarapriya
Music Clips from "My Love (1970)"...

Here are a few music clips from this album with deep influence of East African music...
swarapriya
(Hasrat) Apne Huye Paraye (1964)

After the unexpected death of Amiya Chakrabarty at the young age of 44, his son Ajit took over the reins of his father’s production house. Amiya, as you can recall, directed Dilip Kumar’s maiden venture “Jwar Bhata” in 1944. He also directed him in the 1952 film “Daag” for which Dilipji won his first Filmfare Award. He followed this with “Patita” in 1954, “Seema” in 1955, “Kathputli” in 1957, and also in 1957 “Dekh Kabira Roya”. This was such a formidable line of success for anyone to follow.

Ajit, Amiya’s son, produced and directed only two movies; “Apne Huye Paraye” in 1964 and “Pagla Kahin Ka” in 1970. Neither one made any dent with film going people.

The story of “Apne Huye” borrows heavily from other successful Hindi films, notably 1960’s “Dil Apna Aur Preet Parai”. The lack of character development and predictability make the movie very forgettable. Even Shankar & Jaikishan’s effort seems to be feeble as it is lost in the overall execution of the film. They were assisted by Dattaram & Sebastian. In some of the songs one can see the effect of Sebastian, the use of sax instrument melodiously stands out.

I am uploading all songs from this film in two back-to-back posts. Here is the first set of songs…
swarapriya
Concluding Songs from "Apne Huye Paraye (1964)"...

Here are the rest of the songs from this film...
swarapriya
(Majrooh) Daadi Maa (1966)

This film was produced and directed by L.V. Prasad who was responsible for many hit films in Hindi. His formula for success was simple. Take a successful South Indian film and remake it in Hindi studding it with many stars and embellishing it with beautiful music. But “Daadi Maa” was an exception. For it he decided to forego his proven formula. He chose a film from Telugu, a 1960 flop, “Nithya Kalyaanam Paccha Thoranam”. Convinced that it will make a good movie, he had subtle changes done to the story and in the process came up with a winner.

The name of the movie should have been “Maa”. Because it was all Bina Rai’s film. She gave a great understated performance without going overboard displaying controlled emotions. This probably was best performance of her career. Ashok Kumar as her husband played an unsympathetic role. His role calls for fuming all the time and it is interesting to see of all the people even Dadamoni occasionally could go overboard in expressing anger or disgust.

The movie boasted many players: Binarai, Shashikala, Tanuja, Mumtaz, Chand Usmani, Mukri, Mohan Chhoti, Karan Dewan, David, Dilip Raj, Kashinath, Kanhaiyalal, Rehman, Mahmood, Ashok Kumar, and others…

Roshan Saab’s beautiful music also helped in the success of the movie. Most of the songs became very popular. The song of the album is Mahendra & Manna’s “Unn Ko Toh”. A beautifully done song paying a magnificent tribute to mother. Majrooh Saab’s superb lyrics simply touch your heart and move you. Incidentally, Roshan Saab’s son, Rajesh, himself a fine music director, came up with a similar song for somewhat similar situation. The film was Rakesh Roshan’s 1995 hit film “Karan Arjun”. Both young Roshans are sons of the Senior Roshan Saab. The song was “Suraj Kab Door Gagan Se” sung by Alka Yagnik, Kumar Sanu & Udit Narayan. It was written by Indeewarji.

I am uploading all songs from this film in two back-to-back posts. Here are the songs in the first post…
swarapriya
Concluding Songs from "Daadi Maa (1966)"...

Here are the rest of the songs from this fine album...
swarapriya
(Rajinder Krishan) Jhoola (1962)

This is simply a bad movie with nothing to offer. The only redeeming feature was Salilda’s music. There are several good songs in the film. The duet by Lataji and Mukeshji, “Door Bahut” and Mannada’s stirring solo “Ek Samay Par” stand out. Especially the latter song. Mannada was simply a master at these songs and his rendering of this was simply outstanding. Lataji’s three solos are also not that bad. Salilda later used the tune for one of Lataji’s song, “Aankhon Se Kaajal” in a 1963 Bengali film. I am not sure the name of the movie. The song was by Krishna Chatterjee. I am including that song “Gun Gun Gun Gum” here. It is a beautiful song but I couldn’t tell that it had the same tune as that for “Aankhon”.

Here are these and other songs from this film…
swarapriya
(Shailendra) Shrimatiji (1952)

This Filmistan’s comedy, set in 1942, was directed by I.S. Johar from his own story and screenplay. He also had a supporting role in the film. The film was out and out Shyama’s movie. From the first scene to the last, she was the dominating presence. I am not much of a fan of her but she did a good job in the lighthearted role.

Incidentally Johar’s buddy in the film was played by Majnu. These two come back together once more in Shammi Kapoor’s 1956 hit “Hum Sab Chor Hain”. This was one hit Shammi enjoyed before shaving his moustache for 1957 “Tumsa Nahin Dekha”. These two films were also from Filmistan.

“Shrimatiji” had three music directors; Basant Prakash, Jimmy, and S. Mohinder. Most of the songs were composed by Jimmy. Ravi was the assistant music director. All of songs except two were written by Raja Mehdi Ali Khan. Hasrat Jaipuri and Shailendra contributed lyrics for one song each.

The DVD of the film I had was of very good quality. Unfortunately it was missing two songs. The song “Nain Mila Lo” is one of them. It is available from other sources but the quality is inferior. I am uploading this at 128 KBPS. The second part of this song is from the DVD. It is only 36 seconds long. It is different from this first portion because all female characters and male characters in the movie sing this together. I am not sure whether Shamshadji and Kishoreda were part of this second part of the song. I also have the same question for the song “Aashiqon… (S)”. Did Kishoreda’s voice appear with other male voices in this song? I am not sure. In the song “Hey Baabu” somewhere in the middle of it, one can hear yodeling. I am convinced that was Kishoreda’s voice but cannot authenticate it.

The second song missing from the DVD is Shamshadji’s “Kabhi Hamaare”. Details of this are shown in red italics in the table below. I am requesting members to upload this song if they can. Thank you.

I am uploading all songs I have from this movie in two back-to-back posts. Here is the first set of songs…
swarapriya
Concluding Songs from "Shrimatiji (1952)"...

Here are the rest of the songs from this film...
swarapriya
(Anand Bakshi) Pushpanjali (1970)

Kishore Sahu wrote the story, screenplay, and dialogues for this film besides acting in it, and producing it as well as directing it. His daughter Naina Sahu was the leading lady of the film. Unfortunately Sahu Saab’s story has not much going for it and the movie, in spite of a few good songs, finally disappoints.

The two songs worth mentioning are Mukeshji’ solo “Jaane Chale Jaate Hain” and Lataji’s and Mannada’s beautiful duet “Shaam Dhale”.

I am uploading these and the rest of the songs below…
soumik

Dear Swarapriya,

The lines of the songs are different...First one is Aashiqon Ne Hush Ko while Second one is Aashiqon Ne Ishq Ko...

Definitely the yodeling in the song Hey Babu is of Kishore Kumar's but he was not credited.

Soumik

swarapriya
QUOTE(soumik @ Mar 9 2017, 06:15 AM) *

Dear Swarapriya,

The lines of the songs are different...First one is Aashiqon Ne Hush Ko while Second one is Aashiqon Ne Ishq Ko...

Definitely the yodeling in the song Hey Babu is of Kishore Kumar's but he was not credited.

Soumik




Thanks for the clarification, Soumik. Cheers.

soumik

Slight rectification...

The lines of the songs are different...First one is Aashiqon Ne Hush Ko while Second one is Aashiqon Ne Ishq Ko....

It will be Aashiqon Ko Ishq Ne


Soumik


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Thanks for the clarification, Soumik. Cheers.
[/quote]
swarapriya
(Hasrat Jaipuri) Ayee Milan Ki Bela (1964)

Here is a thoroughly enjoyable and entertaining movie. Beautiful scenery. Great music. Unforgettable songs. Even after 53 plus years these songs have not lost their charm. Shankar & Jaikishan during early 60's simply could not do anything wrong. Everything they touched was a winner. Rightfully so. You can feel their unabated creative energies flowing endlessly with Rafi Saab and Lata equally brilliant playing their part with superb singing. Most of the movies became huge hits because they were all musical blockbusters. They were studded with many memorable songs that were heartwarming to listen to and sound melodious even today. This movie is a prime example of this phenomenon.

This beauty of an album by Shankar & Jaikishan has just one after another melodious song. It boasts some of the great solos of Rafi Saab who brings life to the rich and inspired lyrics of Hasrat Jaipuri, like "Bura Maan Gaye", "Main Pyaar Ka Diwaana", and "Tum Kamsin Ho". This album also has one of my favorite Lata's solo, "Tum Ko Hamaari Umar Lag Jaaye". The song stays fresh forever and each time you listen to it sways you away because of Jaipuri Saab’s rich lyrics and the way Lata delivers it. Melodious. Mesmerizing. It was a typical signature song that S&J had in most of their movies, yet they always sounded fresh with their sweetness that made them so endearing. S&J were ably assisted by Sebastian D’Souza.

The movie treads a very mundane and familiar story. There are many inconsistencies in the plot. For example, whereas the movie’s backdrop was a village there is a scene where a jungle appears and we see a tiger attacking one of the principle characters who happens to be passing through it on a horse. But all such holes in the plot are forgotten thanks to S&J’s great music.

In this movie Rajendra Kumar was the hero and Dharmendra had a secondary role. Dharmendra still was an up and coming actor. But his presence on the screen in this movie was dynamite. His dashing looks, rugged mannerisms, and subdued performance scorch the screen. Even though his role was negative, every scene he appeared with Rajendra, Dharam was simply dominating. You can see that he will be one of those actors worth watching for in the coming years.

I am uploading all songs from this album and a few instrumentals in three back-to-back posts. Here are the songs in the first post...
swarapriya
Concluding Songs from "Ayee Milan Ki Bela (1964)"...

Here are the rest of the songs from this beautiful album...
swarapriya
A Few Instrumentals of the Songs from "Ayee Milan Ki Bela (1964)"...

Here are a few instrumentals of some of the more popular songs from the film...
swarapriya
(Majrooh) Dillagi (1966)

This utterly forgettable movie has few good songs in it. Mukeshji’s duet with Lataji “Tum Meri”, Lataji’s solo “Mere Dil”, and Rafi Saab’s solo “Poochho Toh”. Usha Mangeshkar makes a rare singing appearance with the not so bad song “Ye Aaj Kal”. Here are these and other songs from this album in two back-to-back posts…
swarapriya
Concluding Songs from "Dillagi (1966)"...

Here are the rest of the songs from this movie...
swarapriya
(Rajinder Krishan) Main Chup Rahungi (1962)

This familiar story deals with a woman who sacrifices her happiness for an idiot husband and his foolish father. Countless movies with this theme have been made before and yet they kept making them. This was based on the 1960 Tamil hit “Kalathur Kannamma”. It was made in several other languages. The Tamil film had the distinction that Kamal Haasan made his debut as a child artiste as the orphaned child of the separated parents.

For her performance Meena Kumari was nominated for Filmfare’s Best Actress Award. The same year she was also nominated in the same category for “Aarti” and “Sahib Bibi aur Ghulam”. This was the only time the category had the same person nominated that number of times. She eventually won for “Ghulam”.

The movie boasts several popular songs. I am uploading these in two back-to-back posts. Here are the songs in the first post…
swarapriya
Concluding Songs from "Main Chup Rahungi (1962)"...

Here are the rest of the songs from this film...
swarapriya
(Shailendra) Hariyali aur Rasta (1962)

Songs from this film were recently uploaded in this very thread. They are available starting at the following location...

http://www.hamaraforums.com/index.php?show...mp;#entry751645



swarapriya
(Anand Bakshi) Sharafat (1970)

There is nothing new or novel about this story. Time and again Mumbai filmdom has made movies like this umpteen times before. Time and again, the movie is marred by senseless comedy that simply does not fit into the story.

The movie, thanks to its fine music and the charming young couple Hema Malini and Dharmendra it became a hit. Dharmendra, handsome, debonair, and dashing never looked better. Early in his career, before his senseless action films, he showed a lot of promise. As a decent, good natured, fine educated gentleman, Dharamji steals the show.

There are several good songs in the film. Some of these include Ashaji’s solo “Ek Dinn” and Lataji’s solos “Mera Rasta” and the chartbuster “Sharaafat Chhod Di”. The last mentioned song was such a huge hit that many think it carried the movie to its success.

I am uploading these and other songs below…
swarapriya
(Hasrat Jaipuri) April Fool (1964)

Shankar & Jaikishan made sure that this day, April 1 celebrated as an All Fool's Day around the world, will be remembered by the Indian music lovers forever by composing some of their beautiful and memorable music for this film. Subodh Mukherjee, who introduced Saira Banu in "Junglee" in 1960, is back here with another winner with her in this film.

All songs from this film were chart busters. S&J were assisted by Sebastian and Dattaram.

The song “Aa Gale Lag Jaa” I am uploading here has over 5 minutes of music preceding it. This is the “Pool Aquatics Show” in the movie. I am also uploading this separately as a music clip in the third post.

I am uploading all of the hit songs plus a few music clips from the film in three back-to-back posts. Here is the first set of songs…
swarapriya
Continuing Songs from "April Fool (1964)"...

Here are the rest of the songs from this popular album...
swarapriya
Concluding Songs from "April Fool (1964)"...

Here are a few music clips from the film...
swarapriya
(Majrooh) Mamta (1966)

This emotional rollercoaster was directed by Asit Sen. Suchitra Sen who played the dual role of mother and daughter simply dominated the film from beginning to end with a brilliant and unforgettable performance. Then there was Ashok Kumar. The ease with which he approached his role is simply admirable. Dharmendra in a smaller role also makes a mark.

Ms. Sen was nominated for the Filmfare Best Actress Award but lost it to Waheeda Rehman for her stint in “Guide”. Suchitraji as the mother was so brilliant that she reminded me of great Nargis in the 1957 blockbuster “Mother India”. Many felt that Suchitraji lost the award because her Hindi diction was not that great. Whew!

Another thing going for the movie was the brilliant combination of the lyricist Majrooh Saab working with Roshanji. The result is that their combined product was an absolute charmer. There are mujras, thumris, geets, a ghazal, and several unforgettable songs. Yet for all this sparkling effort, neither Majrooh Saab nor Roshanji were nominated for any awards. Shankar & Jaikishan won the award for “Suraj” the same year.

I am uploading all songs, a couple of specials, and a few instrumentals in four back-to-back posts. Here is the first set of songs…
swarapriya
Concluding Songs from "Mamta (1966)"...

Here are the rest of the songs from this beautiful album...
swarapriya
More Songs Related to "Mamta (1966)"...

Here are a couple of specials (see the great Noor Jehanji's intro of Lataji) and a few instrumentals related to the songs from this film...

swarapriya
Few Instrumentals of the Songs from "Mamta (1966)"...

Here are a few more instrumentals of the songs from the film...
swarapriya
(Rajinder Krishan) Man-Mauji (1962)

This film was a remake of the 1955 Telugu super hit “Donga Ramudu”. Whereas the Telugu film had mixture of comedy, pathos and good songs, for some reason when remade into Hindi most of this was gone with only music worth mentioning. The movie hardly had any comic relief even though Kishoreda was the principal actor. Even the pathos and poignancy of the classic Telugu film were solely missing from the Hindi version. As mentioned only Madan Mohanji was on the mark with his music.

The storyline of the movie borrowed some ideas from the 1943 classic monster hit, Ashok Kumar’s “Kismet”. But the main inspiration came from an English short story, “Loving Brothers”, from a book on anthology of American short stories. That story tells the love between two brothers. In this film it was changed to the relationship between the older brother and his younger sister.

Incidentally, Jaya Lalitha, the future star of Tamil and Telugu films, and who ruled the state of Chennai with iron fist as its Chief Minister, had a cameo appearance in this film as Krishna in the dance drama “Radha Krishan”.

There are several good tracks in the film. Kishoreda’s “Zaroorat Hai” was a chartbuster. Also at the top of the list is Lataji’s solo “Main Toh Tum Sang”. This is closely followed by another Lataji’s solo “Chanda Jaa”. Kishoreda’s other solo “Bura Lagta Hai” was for some reason not included in the film.

I am uploading these and other songs from the film plus a few instrumentals in two back-to-back posts. Here are the songs in the first post…
swarapriya
Instrumentals from "Man-Mauji (1962)"...

Here is a version song of "Main Toh" and a few instrumentals of the same song...
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