Visit our other dedicated websites
Asha Bhonsle Geeta Dutt Hamara Forums Hamara Photos Kishore Kumar Mohd Rafi Nice Songs Shreya Ghoshal
Hamara Forums

Welcome Guest ( Log In | Register )

Anjaan Ji Son

, SANGEET KA SAFAR FILE

 
 
Reply to this topicStart new topic
> Anjaan Ji Son, SANGEET KA SAFAR FILE
surhall
post Feb 24 2007, 02:44 AM
Post #1


Dedicated Member
Group Icon

Group: Angels
Posts: 6767
Joined: 4-November 03
From: Toronto-Canada
Member No.: 86




AAP AUR HUM HF,
SANGGET KA SAFAR FILE HAVE TODAY ABOUT
LATE GRRTKAAR ANJAAN JI SON SAMEER, HE
TODAY NUMBER ONE GEETKAAR AND HIS PAST
AND TODAY.

Friday, February 23, 2007
What is it that makes Sameer the most successful song writer of his generation? He does not possess the intellectual depth of his father Anjaan, the versatility of Shailendra or the deceptive simplicity of Anand Bakshi…Yes, Sameer has his limitations.
What is it that makes Sameer the most successful song writer of his generation? He does not possess the intellectual depth of his father Anjaan, the versatility of Shailendra or the deceptive simplicity of Anand Bakshi…Yes, Sameer has his limitations. But on one count, he has outshone all others, past and present. He is the only living lyricist who, for the past 25 years, has successfully captured the spirit of the Indian youth in song after song and film after film. He knows their pulses, their dreams, their hopes and their concerns. And by articulating them in a language they understand, he has now emerged as the voice of GenNext.
During his early days in Mumbai, Sameer picked up a valuable lesson in song-writing from Majrooh Sultanpuri. It was at Chitragupta’s place that Sameer asked the veteran lyricist how he could write so well to tune. Chitragupt, for one, had a reputation of being a hard taskmaster when it came to setting words to music such that an extra word or syllable from the lyricist that did not fit into his metre would be unacceptable. Majrooh, for another, was known for his versatility in handling different musical genres (from love songs to devotionals to qawwalis) with effortless ease and never falling out of step with any score composed. The rapport these two gentlemen shared was so complete that it would be impossible for anybody to discern whether a song by them was written according to the music or the lyrics were penned first and the tune set later.
As always obliging, Majrooh Sultanpuri let Sameer into a trade secret. In days gone by, when a composer came up with a tune for a film situation, the lyricist had to understand its context, memorise the tune and then write his lines. The memorizing part was the trickiest. Invariably, the lyricist resorted to using dummy words or lines associated with the tune and later on substituting them with the actual lyrics. With portable tape-recorders coming handy, the job of the lyricist became easier. But then, there was a catch. The temptation for a lyricist on hearing a taped musical score would be to switch on and off the recorder, each time fitting in words to the tune. This line-by-line construction of lyrics would rob the composition of its natural spontaneity and flow.
“Every musical composition bears a certain energy, a vibration and a life of its own,” advised Majrooh Sultanpuri. “A good lyricist is one who is able to revitalize these elements with appropriate words. Only then would all the forces combine together to produce a good song. It is not enough to simply juggle around with the language so that words fit perfectly to the music, line by line. Anybody can do that. My advice is to soak in the energies that a musical score produces, feel its sensations and absorb them in your system in entirety. Don’t be in a hurry. Do not listen to it part by part in your tape-recorder. Live with the music in all its fullness till such time you feel motivated enough and you will yourself be surprised how easily words keep tumbling out to embellish a composition. Once you make this a habit, writing to tune will become child’s play.”
Significantly, the song that market Sameer’s debut in Bollywood, demanded the skills of both independent writing and writing to tune. For the film, Bekhabar (1983), music composer Usha Khanna approved the mukhda (opening lines), “Goree pareshaan hai, kaali pareshaan hai, Har gharwaale se gharwaalee pareshaan hai”, as that was all Sameer could produce at that time. For the antara (intermediary lines), she had prepared a tune and it was now for Sameer to conjure up words that would fit in perfectly. The challenge was not only to take the thought of the mukhda ahead, but also to ensure that the intermediary lines


ENJOY THIS SOTRY
DHALL
User is offlineProfile CardPM
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post

Reply to this topicStart new topic
1 User(s) are reading this topic (1 Guests and 0 Anonymous Users)
0 Members:


 



- Lo-Fi Version | Disclaimer | HF Guidelines | Be An Angel Time is now: 21st November 2017 - 11:03 PM