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Sahir Ludhianvi: Silver Memories

, Romantic Sahir

 
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> Sahir Ludhianvi: Silver Memories, Romantic Sahir
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mmuk2004
post Oct 13 2007, 03:49 AM
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Once again, Sahir spins his mesmeric words and emotions around unrequited love in this nazm. He brings a vulnerability to it that is poignant, as the lover seems to be in the very process of tentatively, urgently, questioning his mistress about her emotions even while the title sets that relationship in an ironic context as already doomed to failure. The nazm begins with such beautiful romantic lines, "Mere khwabon ke jharokhon ko sajane wali" and yet it is full of images of dread, of the fear that the emotions and promises that he hopes for, will slip away from him. "Pyar pe bas to nahin hai mera lekin/Tu bata de ke main tujhe pyar karoon ya na karoon" captures his vulnerability, in the throes of of his emotions, he is aware that he has no control over them and yet, inevitably, looks for some certainty from the very person who might take it away from him.

The nazm is reworked in Sone Ki Chidiya(1960) as tandem songs of two stanzas each, sung by Talat and Asha. Have not seen the movie, but considering it features Nutan and Balraj Sahni in the lead roles with Talat himself sporting an appearance, it should be interesting to watch. From what I could glean from the blurb, the story is about Nutan (the "sone ki chidiya") who is exploited by her family when she gets a chance to become a famous actress. She falls for her co-star (Talat!) who, she later comes to realise, is also mainly interested in exploiting her. Finally, she does find happiness with Balraj Sahni (a poet...what else can he be biggrin.gif ) who makes her realise that there is more to human relationships than those based on greed. The story is by Ismat Chugtai, in fact she produced the film.

I am assuming the Talat rendition is the romantic version, so the nazm is tamed to the romantic situation of the film. Sahir changes the order of the lines beginning with the lines "Pyar pe bas to nahin mera lekin", not really out of line with innumerable hindi film song situations where the man wonders whether his love is returned or not. Sahir retained the beautiful first stanza of the nazm intact for the song, and in the second stanza compressed the darker, multiple images of dread of his original nazm to basically a couple of lines:"kahin aisa na ho paon mere tharra jayen" and "Ashk behte rahen khamosh siyah raaton mein". The image (khamosh siyah raaton mein) in the last line does counterpoint the question posed in the earlier stanza: "Mere raaton ke muqaddar mein sehar hai ke nahin." While the song is, naturally, not as complexly wrought as the original nazm (not by a long shot), one cannot help enjoying the melancholy melody of Talat's voice, and savoring the beautiful lines penned by Sahir, for the sheer beauty of the words. OPN has not added much orchestration, (Talat's voice would get completely drowned competing with the instruments) and it sounds so ... beautifully hushed.

I prefer Talat's rendition over Asha's but that is really a matter of personal preference. The Asha version is much more interesting in terms of how Sahir reworked the nazm. Apart from the two main lines, "Pyar bar bas to nahin hai mera lekin/Tu bata de ke tujhe pyar karun ya na karun" the words are completely different from the nazm. It is rendered by a woman who has been abandoned by her lover and the nazm is now styled as a complaint/accusation referring to past promises that have not been fulfilled and the question"Tu bata de ke main tujhe pyar karoon ya na karun" becomes more of a judgement. The complaint is measured, not really agonised, and becomes a quiet understatement of disappointment. "Zindagi yun to hamesha se pareshaan si thi/Ab to kuch aur bhi veeran hui jaati hai." The only other reference to the original nazm is the use of the words "pasheman" and "tamanna" in the song. Here is how "pasheman" was used in the original: "Kaun jane mere imroz(today) ka farda(tomorrow) kya hai/Qurbatein(closeness) badhke pashemaan(ashamed) bhi ho jati hain." The man is unsure of his future, he knows that any intimacy can later become an embarrassment (for the girl...he seems to suggest). He pleads with her "Meri darmaanda(helpless) jawani ki tamannaon ki/Muzmahil(exhausted) khwaab ki taabeer(result) bata de mujhko." The tables are turned in the film version, "Jis tamanna ke sahare pe thi jeene ki ummeed/Wo tammanna bhi pasheman(ashamed) hui jaati hai" What is a vulnerable plea of the male lover riddled with the irony of the situation in the nazm, has become in the film, a situation where the woman is the betrayed one, disillusioned by her trust in the lover's desire. She is, indeed, "ashamed," but the meaning of the word has changed. I wonder if Ismat Chugtai had something to do with the feminist perspective given to the nazm.... wink2.gif

Seriously though, that is typically Sahir, turning something into a strength even while working in a medium which often did not allow much scope for originality. Here it is not really the words of the song that are original, but Sahir's creativity lies in the fact that he could go back to an original, complex work and rework it in the context of mainstream cinema and still manage to suggest an original thought and a different point of view while remaining firmly within the constraints of that medium.

Will upload both the songs in just a bit.



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mmuk2004
post Oct 13 2007, 05:16 AM
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OPN-Sone Ki Chidiyan(1958)-Pyar par bas to(TM_Sahir).mp3
128/4:15

OPN-Sone Ki Chidiyan(1958)-Pyar Par Bas To Nahin-cd(AB_Sahir).mp3
128/3:11



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anjvajay
post Oct 14 2007, 04:01 AM
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Shukriya Madhavi,
Depth badti ja rahi hai.
Likhna ab apne liye likhne me badalta jaa raha hai.
Shubhamasti!
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mmuk2004
post Oct 14 2007, 04:08 AM
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Thank you Ajay, always look forward to your comments. What does "Shubhamasti" mean? Do you know the date of the publication of Mataa-e-ghair?



"This isn't right, this isn't even wrong."
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anjvajay
post Oct 17 2007, 08:09 PM
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QUOTE(mmuk2004 @ Oct 14 2007, 04:08 AM) *

Thank you Ajay, always look forward to your comments. What does "Shubhamasti" mean? Do you know the date of the publication of Mataa-e-ghair?

Welcome Madhavi,
Mere paas jo Qulliyaat hai usme dates nahin hain. Poems alphabetical di huyi hain. Isliye Mataa-e-Ghair ke dates ke baare mein mere liye kuch kahna mushkil hai. Doosare sources se kuchh pata laga to zaroor bataooga.

Shubhamasti=Shubham+Asti=It is Auspicious
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mmuk2004
post Dec 1 2007, 04:54 AM
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QUOTE(mmuk2004 @ Jul 25 2006, 06:39 PM) *

QUOTE(visuja @ Jul 5 2006, 06:38 AM) *


Khuda-e-Bartar - Lata - Taj Mahal - Roshan - Sahir

Khuda-e-Bartar Teri Zamiin Par, Zamiin Ki Khaatir Ye Jung Kyun Hai
Har Ek Fateh-o-Zafar Ke Daaman Pe Khoon-e-Insaan Ka Rang Kyun Hai
Khuda-e-Bartar Teri Zamiin Par, Zamiin Ki Khaatir Ye Jung Kyun Hai...

bartar = surpassing ; fatah = conquest by means of jihad ;
zafar = Conquest, Gain, Triumph, Victory


Zamiin Bhi Teri, Hain Hum Bhi Tere, Ye Milkiyat Ka Sawaal Kya Hai
Ye Qatl-o-Khoon Ka Rivaaz Kyun Hai, Ye Rasm-e-Jang-o-Jadaal Kya Hai
Jinhein Talab Hai Jahaan Bhar Ki, Unhiin Ka Dil Itna Tang Kyun Hai
Khuda-e-Bartar Teri Zamiin Par, Zamiin Ki Khaatir Ye Jung Kyun Hai

milkiyat = Keeping/possession/property ; jadaal = list
talab = quest/Pursuit/demand/search ; tang = Limited


Gareeb Maaon Shareef Behnon Ko Amn-o-Izzat Ki Zindagi De
Jinhein Ataa Kii Hai Tu Ne Taaqat, Unhein Hidaayat Ki Roshni De
Saron Mein Kibr-o-Ghuroor Kyun hai, Dilon Ke Sheeshe Pe Zang Kyun Hai
Khuda-e-Bartar Teri Zamiin Par, Zamiin Ki Khaatir Ye Jung Kyun Hai

amn = peace ; ataa = gift ; hidaayat = Guidance/Instruction/Righteousness
kibr = arrogance/grandness


Khazaa Ke Raste Pe Jaanewaalon Ko Bachke Aane Ki Raah Dena
Dilon Ke Gulshan Ujad Na Jaaye, Mohabbaton Ko Panaah Dena
Jahaan Mein Jashn-e-Wafaa Ke Badle, Ye Jashn-e-Teer-o-Tafang Kyun Hai
Khuda-e-Bartar Teri Zamiin Par, Zamiin Ki Khaatir Ye Jung Kyun Hai

kazaa = death; panaah = protection/shelter
jashn = party/celebration ; tafang = musket





Came across a discussion on this song at HF some time ago while googling...The meanings in bold interspersed in the body of the poem are all from posts on that discussion.

An anti war song that transcends time to be tragically relevant even today. It is imbued with Sahir's secular and humanistic consciousness and has resonating lines such as: "Har ek Fateh-o-Zafar ke daman pe khoone-e-insaan ka rang kyun hai". Why is it that (the lap of) every religious war/victory is stained with humar blood?

The use of the word "daaman"(lap/suggesting shelter/protection) highlights a sense of betrayal (the "lap" of religious wars not providing succor and protection but brutal murders), that tends to get lost in the translation.

"Zamin bhi teri,hain hum bhi tere/Ye milkiyat ka sawal kyun hai" This is not the iconclastic Sahir of "Aasman pe hai khuda aur zamin pe hum/Aaj kal wo is taraf dekhta hai kam". Here he positions himself within the religious consciousness and argues that if as believers we believe that the world is yours and we are yours then how does the issue of possession/ownership and wresting of property come in?

"Jinhen talab hai jahan bhar ki/Unhi ka dil itna tang kyun hai" (Those who are worried about the whole world...this is radical Sahir again bitterly hitting out against religious leaders, actually all demagogues...)

From the larger issues, Sahir comes down to individual traits that fan these larger issues..."Saron me kibr-o-ghuroor kyun hai" "Dilon ke sheeshe pe zang kyun hai" These are situations and charateristics that one faces in everyday, ordinary life that escalate into bloodshed and violence... "Jahan mein jashn-e-wafa ke badle ye jashn-e-teer-o-tafang kyun hai"...

It is a dark poem exposing the futility of war and the human expense at which such wars are fought and is posited as a series of protests to the Almighty in the form of rhetorical questions. However, interspersed in the protests are also some requests by the poet to the almighty...

Gareeb Maaon Shareef Behnon Ko Amn-o-Izzat Ki Zindagi De
Jinhein Ataa Kii Hai Tu Ne Taaqat, Unhein Hidaayat Ki Roshni De


Khazaa Ke Raste Pe Jaanewaalon Ko Bachke Aane Ki Raah Dena
Dilon Ke Gulshan Ujad Na Jaaye, Mohabbaton Ko Panaah Dena


The poet has not given up all hope, he requests for peace, he asks that those who have power use is correctly, he wants those who face death to be able to come back safely... "Mohabbaton ko panaah dena"...beautiful lines, even though he reverts back to the darker questioning by the end of the poem. The poem precariously hangs between despair and hope...


As I have said before, a discussion of the lyrics with some sort of infomation about the musical composition would enhance one's appreciation of a song tremendously. Am including a comment from a friend whose views and analyses I respect tremendously:

QUOTE
archimoz:
For me, two composers were just outstanding. Roshan & Jaidev. Roshan, with his unhurried & lilting style of composition was a true genius. That he had chosen to full blooded raagas to compose two great poems of Sahir in Taj Mahal, requires mind-boggling skills. 'jurm-e-ulfat' & 'khuda-e-barter' in raags 'nat' & 'miyan ki todi'. Roshan's grasp over HCM (he was a student of the great Srikrishna Narayan Ratanjankar, the greatest musicologist of India & the Principal of Marris College at Lucknow).



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mmuk2004
post Dec 1 2007, 05:09 AM
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A Roshan-Sahir combination that raises "Ishq" to dizzying heights using a form that was difficult to use in its traditional form in mainstream cinema...

Check out the video of the song:
Barsaat Ki Raat(1960):Na To Karvaan Ki Talash Hai
(Rafi_Mannadey_SDBatish_AshaBhonsle_SudhaMalhotra)


The lyrics are from this link:
http://mbm1983pet1.blogspot.com/2007/08/ka...aalok-jain.html

Na To Caarvaan Ki Talaash Hai, Na To Humsafar Ki Talaash Hai
Mere Shauq-E-Khaana Kharaab Ko, Teri Rehguzar Ki Talaash Hai

Mere Naamuraad Junoon Ka Hai Ilaaj Koi To Maut Hai
Jo Dava Ke Naam Pe Zehar De Usi Chaaraagar Ki Talaash Hai

Tera Ishq Hai Meri Aarzoo, Tera Ishq Hai Meri Aabroo
Dil Ishq Jism Ishq Hai Aur Jaan Ishq Hai
Imaan Ki Jo Poochho To Imaan Ishq Hai
Tera Ishq Hai Meri Aarzoo, Tera Ishq Hai Meri Aabroo,
Tera Ishq Maein Kaise Chhod Doon, Meri Umra Bhar Ki Talaash Hai

Jaansoz Ki Haalat Ko Jaansoz Hi Samjhega
Maein Shamaa Se Kehta Hoon Mehfil Se Nahin Kehta Kyonki
Ye Ishq Ishq Hai Ishq Ishq, Ye Ishq Ishq Hai Ishq Ishq

Sahar Tak Sabka Hai Anjaam Jal Kar Khaak Ho Jaana,
Bhari Mehfil Mein Koi Shammaa Ya Parvaana Ho Jaye Kyonki
Ye Ishq Ishq Hai Ishq Ishq, Ye Ishq Ishq Hai Ishq Ishq

Vehshat-E-Dil Rasm-O-Deedaar Se Roki Na Gayi
Kisi Khanjar, Kisi Talvaar Se Roki Na Gayi
Ishq Majnu Ki Vo Aavaz Hai Jiske Aage
Koi Laila Kisi Deewaar Se Roki Na Gayi, Kyonki
Ye Ishq Ishq Hai Ishq Ishq, Ye Ishq Ishq Hai Ishq Ishq

Vo Hanske Agar Maangen To Hum Jaan Bhi Deden,
Haan Ye Jaan To Kya Cheez Hai Imaan Bhi Deden Kyonki
Ye Ishq Ishq Hai Ishq Ishq, Ye Ishq Ishq Hai Ishq Ishq

Naaz-O-Andaaz Se Kehte Hain Ki Jeena Hoga,
Zehar Bhi Dete Hain To Kehte Hain Ki Peena Hoga
Jab Maein Peeta Hoon To Kehten Hai Ki Marta Bhi Nahin,
Jab Maein Marta Hoon To Kehte Hain Ki Jeena Hoga
Ye Ishq Ishq Hai Ishq Ishq, Ye Ishq Ishq Hai Ishq Ishq

Mazhab-E-Ishq Ki Har Rasm Kadi Hoti Hai,
Har Kadam Par Koi Deewaar Khadi Hoti Hai
Ishq Aazad Hai, Hindu Na Musalmaan Hai Ishq,
Aap Hi Dharm Hai Aur Aap Hi Imaan Hai Ishq
Jis Se Aagaah Nahi Shekh-O-Barahaaman Dono,
Us Haqeeqat Ka Garajtaa Hua Ailaan Hai Ishq

Ishq Na Puchhe Deen Dharm Nu, Ishq Na Puchhe Jaataan
Ishq De Haathon Garam Lahu Vich, Doobiyaan Lakh Baraataan Ke
Ye Ishq Ishq Hai Ishq Ishq, Ye Ishq Ishq Hai Ishq Ishq

Raah Ulfat Ki Kathin Hai Ise Aasaan Na Samajh
Ye Ishq Ishq Hai Ishq Ishq, Ye Ishq Ishq Hai Ishq Ishq

Bahut Kathin Hai Dagar Panghat Ki
Ab Kya Bhar Laun Maein Jamuna Se Matki
Maein Jo Chali Jal Jamuna Bharan Ko
Dekho Sakhi Ji Maein Jo Chali Jal Jamuna Bharan Ko
Nandkishor Mohe Roke Jhaadon To
Kya Bhar Laun Maein Jamuna Se Matki
Ab Laaj Raakho More Ghoonghat Pat Ki

Jab Jab Krishn Ki Bansi Baaji, Nikali Raadha Saj Ke
Jaan Ajaan Ka Maan Bhula Ke, Lok Laaj Ko Taj Ke
Janak Dulaari Ban Ban Doli, Pahan Ke Prem Ki Maala
Darshan Jal Ki Pyaasi Meera Pi Gai Vishh Ka Pyaala
Aur Phir Araj Kari Ke
Laaj Raakho Raakho Raakho, Laaj Raakho Dekho Dekho,
Ye Ishq Ishq Hai Ishq Ishq, Ye Ishq Ishq Hai Ishq Ishq

Allah Rasool Ka Farmaan Ishq Hai
Yaane Hafeez Ishq Hai, Quraan Ishq Hai
Gautam Kaa Aur Maseeh Ka Armaan Ishq Hai
Ye Kaaynaat Jism Hai Aur Jaan Ishq Hai
Ishq Sarmad, Ishq Hi Mansoor Hai
Ishq Moosa, Ishq Koh-E-Noor Hai
Khaaq Ko But, Aur But Ko Devta Karta Hai Ishq
Intaha Ye Hai Ke Bande Ko Khuda Karta Hai Ishq

Haan Ishq Ishq Tera Ishq Ishq
Tera Ishq Ishq, Ishq Ishq





"This isn't right, this isn't even wrong."
Wolfgang Pauli (1900-1958)

"There are no facts, only interpretations."
Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900)

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mmuk2004
post Dec 1 2007, 05:11 AM
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First some information on Qawwali as a form.

Have only been recently introduced to it, so am basically using information from these websites that I found useful:
http://www.osa.co.uk/qawwali_history.html
http://www.arigoldfilms.com/qawwali.html


Qawwali is a form associated with the Sufi tradition in Islam, and the particular practices that the Sufi saints developed to get close to god. It developed from a variety of roots such as philosophy, science, mathematics,musicology and literature... at around the 11th century A.D. The Muslim philosopher Al-Ghazali is credited with codifying it in his book "The Book of the Right Usages of Audition and Trance," written in the beginning of the 12th century. It is considered an important book on the traditions of Sufism.

Sama : was an important element of Sufism which is a kind of spiritual concert where the music was sung by a soloist or a chorus using instrumental elements of varying importance. The audience listened and and let themselves become involved in a trance like state and the return to a normal state would again be brought about by appropriate music..

"a mode which brings one closer to the experience of this inner truth by presenting the words (kalam) in the vehicle of music, thus providing an intangible; interplay between form and content, dwelling on certain words to give them a wider context, creating great depth in the apparently simple language of certain Sufic texts. The qawwals often dwell on one phrase or sentence, indicating both the obvious and hidden content by emphasizing and repeating various words and syllables, taking the audience into the discovery of hitherto not obvious meanings. A spinning wheel thus changes from a household instrument into the wheel of life or the wheel of hope depending on the shift of emphasis in one sentence. Repeating a sentence until all meaning is exhausted and it becomes meaningless is another technique for bringing the audience closer to the elusive ma'rifat. Through this technique, semantic reality is negated and a purity of form is created. It is often this element that transcends linguistic barriers."



"This isn't right, this isn't even wrong."
Wolfgang Pauli (1900-1958)

"There are no facts, only interpretations."
Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900)

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mmuk2004
post Dec 1 2007, 06:37 AM
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History of qawwali: contd. ph34r.gif

In India, the Chishti school is associated with the spread of Sufism and its propogation of its message through the form of the qawwali. One of its most respected saints was Khwaja Moinuddin Chisti(1143-1234) who lived in Delhi and later retired to Ajmer. Nizamuddin Auliya(1236-1325) was another Sufi saint who lived in Delhi and was famous for his use of music to spread the message of sufism. Khusrau(1254-1324) whose inspiration was Nizamuddin Aulia, is credited with mixing the Persian and Indian elements in the Qawwali.

"The languages of South Asia were freely used by Amir Khusraw in his compositions - Purbi (the language of Bihar) and Braj Bhasha. In Pakistan today, traditional qawwal still start their performance with a Farsi invocation, moving on to the South Asian language, Panjabi and moving further eastwards vvith Hindi, Urdu and Purbi. This west to east transition is also reflected in many Sufi texts of this region. This sequence is not followed in India, where the transitional link is not as strong."

The mystical underpinnings of Sufism went hand in hand with the secular orientation of its message of tolerance... and when the form of the Qawwali was appropriated by the film industries of both India and Pakistan, it was glamorized to shed its religious roots. Qawwalis focussed instead on love(even that can be traced back to the mystical tradition of using the love of the beloved as a metaphor of love for god), and other elements such as social commentary, satire and humor.

QUOTE

http://www.osa.co.uk/qawwali_history.html

The mystic imagery of qawwali began to be used for secular purposes: for examples;: the concept of wine in sufism indicates the secret knowledge ma’rifat), but this concept was effectively used in an orgiastic qawali by ths Sabri Btothers:,. "men sharabi" ("I am a drinker"). This was done so skillfuly as to make the interpretation open to the audience, while a (loose religious symbolism was retained. The film industry in Pakistan, realising the potential of qawwali, began to use it as a form of entertainment. Starting as performances in the traditional context at a sacred shrine (such as the memorable qawwali scene in the experimental film "samundar" (the Ocean in which a quasi-religious atmosphere is created), it moved on to humour. In the latter case, the qawwali form was used as a satire and the content was so disparate with traditional mystic imagery that laughter resulted. Such an inversion of religious content to create a comic effect is generally frowned upon by the orthodoxy and not accepted by qawwal themselves.

Going one step ahead after the secularization of qawwali, it began to emerge in stage shows at urban centres as a dialogue. Humourous exchanges between opposed groups of male and female performers respectively became a feature of entertaining programmes staged by young students at college functions.

The latest development of the qawwali form in this context has been the use of Pashto qawwali as a form of dialogue and social criticism. Qawwali cassettes in the Pashto language talk about the travails of Pushtun migrant ,labour in the major urban centres and Pakistan Television airs humourous dialogues between opposing groups (such as truckdrivers and the general public). Qawwali exists in most languages of Pakistan (with the exception of Sindhi and perhaps Baluchi) and continues to grow vigorously; the form being retained and the content changing with need and use.



Okay, only this much for today... rolleyes.gif will hopefully complete this by the weekend... In the meantime, if anyone has a good audio copy of "Ye Ishq Ishq Hai" please do upload.



"This isn't right, this isn't even wrong."
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Hari Ram
post Dec 1 2007, 08:10 PM
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QUOTE(mmuk2004 @ Nov 30 2007, 07:07 PM) *

Okay, only this much for today... rolleyes.gif will hopefully complete this by the weekend... In the meantime, if anyone has a good audio copy of "Ye Ishq Ishq Hai" please do upload.

Madhavi,

I have the following three audios of this song:

yeh ishq ishq hai ishq ishq - 7:08 min
naa to kaarwaan ki talaash hai - 7:22 & 11:53min

The audio of 11:53 duration might be from Sukesh.
I can upload any of the above audios.

Hari Ram
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Aurous
post Dec 1 2007, 08:23 PM
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Even I have the 11:53 one. Will share, if required.
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Yasmin
post Dec 7 2007, 07:41 PM
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QUOTE(mmuk2004 @ Jul 26 2006, 09:56 PM) *

Thanks Vivek, and please call me Madhavi. Ji gives me some "ji"tters biggrin.gif

Setting the scene for romance... Weather and the ambience permitting, the lovers gear up to admit to the great emotion...

Jaal:1952:SDB
Ye raat ye chandni phir kahan
Sun ja dil ki dastaan..


Joru Ka Bhai:1955:Jaidev
Surmai raat hai sitare hain...aaj dono jahan hamare hain
Subah ka intezaar kaun kare
Phir ye rut ye sama mile na mile
Aarzoo ka chaman khile na khile
Waqt ka aetbaar kaun kare..


House No.44 : 1955:SDB
Chup hai dharti chup hain chand sitare
Mere dil ki dhadkan tujhko pukare



Vaasna:1968:Chitragupt
Ye parbaton ke daere ye shaam ka dhuaan
Aise mein kyun na ched de dilon ki dastaan...


Girlfriend:1960:HK
Kashti ka khamosh safar hai shaam bhi hai tanhai bhi
Door kinare par bajti hain lehron ki shehnai bhi
Aaj mujhe kuch kehna hai


Love this Kishore gem from the sixties. Interesting song, the lover sets the scene for the song, and the girl is impatient to hear him confess to his love, and yet by the end of the song, he has not said the "kuch" that he sets out to say at the beginning. A teaser of a confession, he manages to get the girl to admit to the emotion, gets a commitment for the relationship and then... "Chodo ab kya kehna hai" ... Smart man... wink.gif Sahir playing with words again, setting the scene and then undermining it, suggesting that commitment does not really need verbal expression...

Do add on more "ambience" songs to this list... smile.gif

Am uploading two of the above songs from Girlfriend and Joru ka Bhai.

Plz Re-Upload all songs from Joru Ka Bhai
thanx a lot in Advance
Regards
Yasmin.

Hum Tujhe Bhool ke Khush Baithe hain
Hum sa....Bedard.....Koi....kya.....hoga !
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Hari Ram
post Dec 7 2007, 09:27 PM
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QUOTE(Yasmin @ Dec 7 2007, 08:11 AM) *

Plz Re-Upload all songs from Joru Ka Bhai
thanx a lot in Advance
Regards
Yasmin.


I have uploaded Joru Ka Bhai album here:
http://www.hamaraforums.com/index.php?s=&a...st&p=444844
Since not all songs were written by Sahir Ludhianvi, it was uploaded in Jaidev's thread.

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Yasmin
post Dec 7 2007, 09:41 PM
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oh great upload Hari Ram smile1.gif
thanx a lot
Regards
Yasmin.

Hum Tujhe Bhool ke Khush Baithe hain
Hum sa....Bedard.....Koi....kya.....hoga !
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Yasmin
post Dec 7 2007, 09:53 PM
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i cudnt find Sahir's Songs from Azadi ki raah par anywhere on earth
can u help me in it sir ?

Hum Tujhe Bhool ke Khush Baithe hain
Hum sa....Bedard.....Koi....kya.....hoga !
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