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What Is Sanskreet

 
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IDOL
post Apr 28 2006, 05:29 AM
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Hi Friends,



My classmate is from Burma.......he showed me his language's writing........the alphabet..........he said that it came from Sanskret.........i used to think that Sanskreet is Hindu Religion's Holy book.........now i wonder if it's a peice of litrature......or?........plz do share ur knowledge.........



thank u






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Mandrake
post Apr 28 2006, 07:04 AM
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Khobi dear, pls make a visit to India. You'll learn a lot of things here smile1.gif

Sanskrit is the mother language. It is said (don't have to believe this) that it is the first structured language to be spoken on earth. All Indian/subcontinental languages originate from it. Some parts of Greek and Russian are also extremely similar to it. It is the oldest language still spoken, written and taught in India.

The structure of sanskrit is so precise that computer programmers have long accepted that it is the perfect language to use in programming (programmers might explain just how).

Sanskrit is a language. It is written in a script called Devnaagari (meaning - from the city of gods). I believe Burmese write in a script called Braahmi (meaning 'originating from Brahma'). Though I may be wrong. Braahmi and Devnaagari don't resemble each other, though the core is the same.

A bit on Braahmi. It is named after Brahma, the creator god of the hindus. The giant river that flows northeast of India is called Brahmaputraa (meaning - daughter of Brahma). Burma is the modified version of 'Brahma'. Previously, Burma was called Brahmadesh (meaning 'Brahma's country').
A substantial part of the northeast and east Indian languages uses braahmi script.

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august
post Apr 29 2006, 04:56 PM
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Sanskrit is also called as "girvaan bharati" (language spoken by God).
researchers have found many connections between ancient languages like sanskrit and latin.
also the sanskrit-german relations are well-known.







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IDOL
post Apr 29 2006, 07:36 PM
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QUOTE(Mandrake @ Apr 27 2006, 07:34 PM) *
Khobi dear, pls make a visit to India. You'll learn a lot of things here smile1.gif

Sanskrit is the mother language. It is said (don't have to believe this) that it is the first structured language to be spoken on earth. All Indian/subcontinental languages originate from it. Some parts of Greek and Russian are also extremely similar to it. It is the oldest language still spoken, written and taught in India.

The structure of sanskrit is so precise that computer programmers have long accepted that it is the perfect language to use in programming (programmers might explain just how).

Sanskrit is a language. It is written in a script called Devnaagari (meaning - from the city of gods). I believe Burmese write in a script called Braahmi (meaning 'originating from Brahma'). Though I may be wrong. Braahmi and Devnaagari don't resemble each other, though the core is the same.

A bit on Braahmi. It is named after Brahma, the creator god of the hindus. The giant river that flows northeast of India is called Brahmaputraa (meaning - daughter of Brahma). Burma is the modified version of 'Brahma'. Previously, Burma was called Brahmadesh (meaning 'Brahma's country').
A substantial part of the northeast and east Indian languages uses braahmi script.




that was so sweet of u mandrake...............u gave me enough information........and i luv it...........now that burmese boy says his language originaged from Saskrit........so as u say the core is one.......then he's right.........thank u so much for such useful information


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Mandrake
post Apr 29 2006, 07:46 PM
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always happy to be of use, Khobi smile.gif

A small footnote: the word 'sanskrit', generally translated, means 'processed'. Anything that undergoes a series of processes (usually sucessfully) for betterment, is called 'sanskrit'.

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Sharad
post Sep 15 2006, 12:38 PM
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Mandrake
do you happen to know when the present day hindi was made ?

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NATURE
post Sep 25 2006, 07:57 PM
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khobi jaan, everything is told by mandrake ji. anyway, mandi ji. brahmaputra is male right ?
so it would be son of brahma, i guess. ( putra is son, in my mother tongue brahmaputra is a male river )

It has a position in culture of South Asia and Southeast Asia similar to that of Latin and Greek in Europe, and
is a central part of Hindu tradition and Philosophy. Its pre-Classical form as the Chandas language (appearing
in the Vedas) is one of the earliest attested members of the Indo-European language family, with the
language of the Rigveda being the oldest and most archaic stage preserved.

Today, Sanskrit is used as a ceremonial language in Hindu religious rituals in the forms of hymns and
mantras. The vast literary tradition of Sanskrit in the form of the Hindu scriptures and the philosophical
writings are also studied. The corpus of Sanskrit literature encompasses a rich tradition of poetry and
literature, as well as scientific, technical, philosophical and religious texts.

The scope of this article is the Classical Sanskrit language as laid out in the grammar of Panini, around 500
BC.

The oldest surviving Sanskrit grammar is Pāṇini's Aṣtādhyāyī ("Eight-Chapter Grammar") dating to ca. the
5th century BC. It is essentially a prescriptive grammar, i.e., an authority that defines (rather than
describes) correct Sanskrit, although it contains descriptive parts, mostly to account for Vedic forms that
had already passed out of use in Panini's time.

other indian languaes like telugu, kannada, malayalam, bengali, assamese, hindi, oriya borrowed so much
from sanskrit while tamil borrowed less than other languages.

yes, it's very close to computer language. what computer scientists say: hindu god and computers speak
sanskrit and it can be easily communicated with the machine language.

here are nemerals of sanskrit:

1 éka
2 dví
3 trí
4 catúr
5 pańca
6 ṣáṣ
7 saptá, sápta
8 aṣṭá, áṣṭa
9 náva
10 dáśa

************************

sharad ji, as far as i know there's no specific time when hindi was evolved.

1,000 AD is commonly accepted. Hindi evolved from Sanskrit, by way of the Middle Indo-Aryan
Prakrit languages and Apabhramsha of the Middle Ages.
when muslim leaders came to india, a thousand years of influence and mixure of persian, hindi and arabic
created another beautiful language called urdu.

Hindi is written in Devanagari and draws its vocabulary with words from Sanskrit, while urdu draws heavily
on Persian and Arabic vocabulary and also borrows dialects from hindi, so linguists consider hindi and
urdu to be the same.

Jo Milte hain, voh nahi milte
Aur Jo Nahi Milte, Vohin Vaastav mein milte hai
Kaaran jo hai, voh nahi hai
Aur jo nahi hai, vohin hai.
Ye keval Shabdo ki heraa-pheri nahi hai
Aur heraa-pheri hain bhi
Yehin Darshan hai
Aur isi hone naa hone, milne naa milne ke beech mein
maayaa kaa samudra hai
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sbfan
post Jan 8 2007, 03:58 PM
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very nice discussion.. was sanskrit language of common people at some time as i read that gatam buddha gave his teachings in prakrit saying that its lang of massess.... what i guess in much older times...
when does punjabi(vocal mean) etc and othe local languages develope they appear to be so diff but popular in mass public even those who can't understand hindi.. but root said is same
from where tamil originated and other dravidian languages...
is there anyy hindu literature which not in sanskrit but in local languages only and of importance??

MERI NEENDON MEIN TUM
MERE KHWABON MEIN TUM

LONG LIVE SHAMSHAD BEGUM
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Mandrake
post Jan 8 2007, 04:11 PM
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I guess I didn't see this thread for a long time. Sharad's query has been answered by Nature.
Nature, about 'Putra' being son you are right. But note the extra 'a' in my post. In devnagari, it is written as putraa - and is referred to as female. But there is a bit of confusion there.
In old texts, it is often mentioned that all other rivers are 'nadi' (river in sanskrit - female gender) and Brahmaputraa is the only 'nad' (river - male gender) owing to its immense size. In that case, the 'son' fits. But when they refer to it, they keep the reference as female.

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Mandrake
post Jan 8 2007, 04:13 PM
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QUOTE
is there anyy hindu literature which not in sanskrit but in local languages only and of importance??

Yes sbfan, one of the biggest literatures of all times, the Dnyaneshwari - written by Sant Gyaneshwar, was written in Marathi. It was specifically not written in sanskrit as he wanted the masses to avail of the knowledge that the brahmins so jealously guarded.

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august
post Jan 8 2007, 07:25 PM
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i thought that word ' putri' was used for daughter. unsure.gif

didn't know about Brahmaputraa being 'nad'.

i remember little bit of
nadi.. nadyo.. nady: prathama
nadim nadyo nadi: dwitiya
nadaya nadabhyam nadibhi: tritiya

am i getting it wrong? the only word i can recall completely is 'Dev'.


Sant Dnyaneshwar also wrote ' amrit-anubhav'. (Sant = Saint)








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sbfan
post Jan 8 2007, 07:35 PM
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QUOTE(Mandrake @ Jan 8 2007, 04:13 PM) *

QUOTE
is there anyy hindu literature which not in sanskrit but in local languages only and of importance??

Yes sbfan, one of the biggest literatures of all times, the Dnyaneshwari - written by Sant Gyaneshwar, was written in Marathi. It was specifically not written in sanskrit as he wanted the masses to avail of the knowledge that the brahmins so jealously guarded.

can u throw more light on this text..
yes brahmans guarded the scriptures and also limited sanskrit even in punjab too which becam most imp reason4sikh religion..but they mastered them so good that when invasions took place they had vocal memorized all texts

MERI NEENDON MEIN TUM
MERE KHWABON MEIN TUM

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parag_sankla
post Jan 8 2007, 07:49 PM
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QUOTE(Mandrake @ Jan 8 2007, 04:13 PM) *

QUOTE
is there anyy hindu literature which not in sanskrit but in local languages only and of importance??

Yes sbfan, one of the biggest literatures of all times, the Dnyaneshwari - written by Sant Gyaneshwar, was written in Marathi. It was specifically not written in sanskrit as he wanted the masses to avail of the knowledge that the brahmins so jealously guarded.


Suhas, I think it is the other way round as far as my knowledge goes.

Since the "Shri Bhagwadgeeta" written in Sanskrit was not accessible to the common man (due to the fact that the knowledge of Sanskrit was limited to a few elites), Sant Dnyaneshwar translated it into Marathi. That is the birth of Dnyaneshwari. It is not exactly word to word translation but "Rasaal Anuwad" ( extended translation or transliteration ?)


Please visit www.geetadutt.com
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sbfan
post Jan 8 2007, 07:56 PM
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practiclly the language i think most close to sanskrit is marathi.. not even hindi.. what i feel

MERI NEENDON MEIN TUM
MERE KHWABON MEIN TUM

LONG LIVE SHAMSHAD BEGUM
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Mandrake
post Jan 8 2007, 08:50 PM
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Parag, I think we are talking the same thing. smile1.gif
The geeta was in sanskrit. Dnyaneshwari is its translation - in a way. BUT, the Dnyaneshwari WAS written in Marathi.

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