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> Welcome To Afghanistan, In connection with The Khobi SHow
Afghan Music Info
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IDOL
post Sep 9 2006, 12:42 AM
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Afghanistan Today Sports
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Sports
Kabul is the Center of Annual Buzkashi & Soccer Tournaments, where teams from all over Afghanistan, Pakistan, Iran, Uzbekistan, Tajikistan participate. Sports is a daily routine for employees in Afghanistan, when they all join each other in tournaments and matches, specially soccer games. Afghanistan's Soccer Team also participated in many Asian Soccer Leagues. Most of the Afghans who returned from India and Pakistan to Afghanistan after the war brought cricket to the nation, and Afghanistan has had a cricket team since then. They play against Pakistani and Hindi Teams. There are boxing, taekwondo, volleyball, and kung fu teams in Kabul, which participate in tournaments locally and go on tours to other Asian countries. One of the oldest and most popular stadiums in Kabul is Ghazi stadiums, where tournaments, concerts, and National celebrations take place, however the city has lost most of the stadiums it previously had. Ghazi Stadium is currently going through a reconstruction programme whereby a new design and a new system will be established for the stadium. Schools and universities encourage participation in team sports, and there is a group of Afghans are being trained in Kabul for the next Olympic Games


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post Sep 9 2006, 12:51 AM
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Afghanistan culture


Culture
Main article: Culture of AfghanistanAfghans display pride in their country, ancestry, and above all, their independence. Like other highlanders, Afghans are regarded with mingled apprehension and condescension, for their high regard for personal honor, for their clan loyalty and for their readiness to carry and use arms to settle disputes.[15] As clan warfare / internecine feuding has been one of their chief occupations since time immemorial, this individualistic trait has made it difficult for foreign invaders to hold the region.

Afghanistan has a complex history that has survived either in its current cultures or in the form of various languages and monuments. However, many of the country's historic monuments have been damaged in recent wars. The two famous statues of Buddha in the Bamiyan Province were destroyed by the Taliban, who regarded them as idolatrous. Other famous sites include the very cities of Herat, Ghazni and Balkh. The Minaret of Jam, in the Hari Rud valley, is a UNESCO World Heritage site.

The people of Afghanistan are prominent horsemen as the national sport is Buzkashi, similar to Polo, but instead which a goat carcass is used instead of a ball. Afghan hounds (a type of running dogs) also originated in Afghanistan.

Although literacy levels are very low, classic Persian poetry plays a very important role in Afghan culture. Poetry has always been one of the major educational pillars in both Iran and, consequently, Afghanistan, to the level that it has integrated itself into culture. Persian culture has, and continues to, exert a great influence of Afghan culture. Private poetry competition events known as “musha’era” are quite common even among ordinary people. Almost every home owns one or more poetry collection of some sort, even if it is not read often.

The eastern dialects of the Persian language are popularly known as "Dari" outside of Iran. The name itself derives from "Pārsī-e Darbārī", meaning Persian of the royal courts. The ancient term Darī - one of the original names of the Persian language - was revived in the Afghan constitution of 1964, and was intended "to signify that Afghans consider their country the cradle of the language. Hence, the name Fārsī, the langue of Fārs, is strictly avoided."[16]

Many of the famous Persian poets of 10th to 15th centuries stem from what is now known as Afghanistan. They were mostly also scholars in many disciplines like languages, natural sciences, medicine, religion and astronomy. Examples are Mowlānā Rumi, who was born and educated in Balkh in the 13th century and moved to Konya in modern-day Turkey, Sanaayi Ghaznavi (12th century, native of Ghazni provice), Jāmī of Herāt (15th century, native of Jam-e-Herat in western Afghanistan), Nizām ud-Dīn Alī Sher Navā'ī, (15th century, Herat province). However, it must be acknowledged that most of these individuals were of Persian (Tājīk) ethnicity who still form the second-largest ethnic group in Afghanistan. Also, some of the contemporary Persian language poets and writers, who are relatively well-known in both Iran and Afghanistan include Ustad Behtab, Khalilullah Khalili [17], Sufi Ghulam Nabi Ashqari [18], Parwin Pazwak and others.

In addition to poets, the region of Afghanistan produced numerous scientists. Most notable was Avicenna (Abu Alī Hussein ibn Sīnā) whose father hailed from Balkh. Ibn Sīnā, who travelled to Isfahan later in life to establish a medical school there, is known by some scholars as "the father of modern medicine". George Sarton called ibn Sīnā "the most famous scientist of Islam and one of the most famous of all races, places, and times." His most famous works are The Book of Healing and The Canon of Medicine, also known as the Qanun. Ibn Sīnā's story even found way to the contemporary English literature through Noah Gordon's The Physician, now published in many languages.

Before the Taliban gained power, the city of Kabul was home to many musicians who were masters of both traditional and modern Afghan music, especially during the Nauroz-celebration. Kabul in the middle part of the 20th century has been likened to Vienna during the 18th and 19th centuries.

The tribal system, which orders the life of most people outside metropolitan areas, is certainly as potent in political terms as the national state system of 1914 Europe. Men feel a fierce loyalty to their own tribe, such that, if called upon, they would assemble in arms under the tribal chiefs and local clan leaders (Khans) in the same way that men throughout Europe "flocked to the colours" in 1914, forming up in regional divisions and battalions under the command of the local nobility and gentry. In theory, under Islamic law, every believer has an obligation to bear arms at the ruler's call (Ulul-Amr), but this was no more needed than was enforced conscription to fill the ranks of the British Army in 1914. The Afghan shepherd or peasant went to war for much the same mixture of reasons as the more "civilised" European clerk or factory worker - a desire for adventure, a desire not to be left out or lose esteem in the eyes of his fellows, a contempt for invading foreigners, revenge against those that ruined his family life or threatened his faith, perhaps even the chance of extra cash or enhanced personal prospects.

The tribal system is not something particularly backward or warlike. It is simply the best way of organizing large groups of people in a country that is geographically difficult, and in a society that has an uncomplicated lifestyle - from a materialistic point of view.[15]



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post Sep 9 2006, 01:01 AM
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<H1 class=firstHeading>Culture of Afghanistan</H1><H3 id=siteSub>From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia</H3>Jump to: navigation, searchThe culture of Afghanistan has been around for millennia. Afghanistan's culture is largely influenced by Islam but has also been influenced by religions such as Buddhism and Zoroastrianism. Afghanistan has been a crossroads for India, Iran, and Central Asia which has influenced its culture.

//




Names
The people of Afghanistan are referred to as Afghans. However within Afghanistan, many Afghans refer to themselves based on their ethnic group.




Art
Afghan Art has spanned many centuries. One of the most famous types is the Gandhara Art between the 1st and 7th centuries which had Greco-Roman ancestry. Since the 1900's Afghanistan began to use Western techniques in Art. Art was originally almost entirely done by men but recently in theatre arts women have begun to take center stage [1]. Afghan art is largely centered at the Kabul Museum. Other well known forms of art in Afghanistan are Music and Poetry.

IPB Image IPB ImageFarhad Darya, a very popular Afghan singer who sings in both Farsi and Pashto


Music
Main article: Music of AfghanistanIPB Image IPB ImageAhmad Zahir is a beloved and popular singer in Afghanistan and bordering countriesSince the 1980s, Afghanistan has been involved in near constant violence. As such, music has been suppressed and recording for outsiders minimal. During the 1990s, the Taliban government banned instrumental music and much public music-making. In spite of arrests and destruction of musical instruments, Afghan musicians have continued to ply their trade into the present. The capital of Kabul has long been the regional cultural capital, but outsiders have tended to focus on the city of Herat, which is more closely related to Iranian music. Lyrics across the country are typically in Persian and Pashto.




Afghan Poetry
Main article: Afghan poetryAfghan poetry is primarily written in Pashto and Persian (known as Darī in Afghanistan). The most famous forms of poetry in Afghanistan are Ghazal and Charbeiti both of which were originally unique to the Persian language but have since been used by other languages.

Charbeiti is told in four lines and usually describes love, youth, war, or events in the poet's life. They are often passed on orally which often leads to multiple variations of a poem [2]. By: atal miakhell




Architecture
IPB Image IPB ImageCourt of the Friday Mosque in Herāt.Afghanistan has made major contributions to world architecture. UNESCO has acknowledged Afghanistan's role by declaring the Minaret of Jam and the Valley of Bamiyan, home of the famous Buddhas destroyed by the Taliban, World Heritage Sites.

Other examples of universally important contributions to architecture may be found in Herat, Mazar-i-Sharif and Ghazni. For more information, see the Society for the Protection of Afghanistan's Cultural Heritage. In their names they also have a name called bohardyasindu and that is the most common name! [3]




Afghan Food
Afghanistan has a wide varying landscape allowing for many different crops. Afghan food is largely based upon cereals like wheat, maize, barley and rice which are the nation's chief crops. Afghanistan is well known for its grapes. [4]

Some Afghan cuisine:

IPB Image IPB ImageQabili PalauIPB Image IPB ImageNan-i-Afghani


Clothing
Traditional male Afghan clothing usually includes a Pakol (hat), Lungee (turban), and a Chapan (coat). Traditional Afghan dress for women includes a two-piece outfits consisting of loose trousers worn under a tunic with a high neck and long sleeves. The clothes are fitted loosely at the waist and extending below the knees, with the straight skirt slit up both sides for ease of movement. Many women complete the outfit with a long scarf gracefully draped across the shoulders. More elaborate and fancier clothing are dresses adorned with gold threading and silk fabrics in many different colors. These are usually worn at special occasions like weddings.




Sports
Most official Afghan sports are run by the Afghan Sports Federation which promotes soccer, basketball, volleyball, track, bowling and chess. Afghanistan fields 7 players at FIDE with its highest rated being Saifudin Ayyoubi with a rating of 2178. A popular and ancient sport unique to Afghanistan is the Buzkashi.




Education
Education in Afghanistan has recently been revitalized after the fall of the Taliban. Primary education lasts six years. If the student does well on the entrance exam they are then admitted into Secondary education, which is divided into 7-9 and 10-12. A new structure that allows eight years of primary and four years of secondary education will probably be considered in the near future.




Higher Education
Higher education is provided by mainly six universities in Afghanistan, which includes the University of Islamic Studies, an Agricultural Insitute and a Polytechnic, a State Medical Institute and two teacher training institutes. Recently with help from UNESCO over 1000 women have taken university entrance examinations.




Language
There are two official languages, Dari Persian and Pashto, which are spoken by a majority of the population, though several other languages are spoken regionally. Dari is spoken by approximately 1/2 of the population in Afghanistan, while Pashto has over 9 million speakers. The largest Pashto-speaking cities are Kandahar and Kabul, the capital. Pashto was recognized in 1936 as an official language by a royal decree. In the north Tajik, Uzbek, and Turkmen are widely spoken. There are over 70 smaller languages spoken throughout the country, including Hazaragi.




Religion
IPB Image IPB ImageThe Blue Mosque in Mazar-e-Sharif.The overwhelming majority of Afghans (about 99 percent) are Muslims. Roughly, 80% of the population is Sunni, while only 19% is Shi'a Muslim. There are an estimated 3,000 Afghan Christians.[5]. An important figure in Muslim life in Afghanistan is the mullah (a male religious leader or teacher). Any man who can recite the Koran (the sacred scripture of Islam) from memory can be a mullah. [6]




Housing
Afghan's generally live in areas where others of the same nationality live. Afghan houses are traditionally made of a series of rooms located around a private rectangular courtyard where women and children play, cook and socialize. Married sons share the same house as their parents, although they have separate quarters. Some Afghan houses contain a special room where men socialize with each other. In the cities many Afghans live in apartments. The nomadic population of Afghanistan lives in tents.[7]




Holidays
Holidays in Afghanistan are celebrated according to the lunar calendar while other secular holidays are celebrated based on the solar calendar. On holidays Afghans usually visit their family and friends where they prepare lavish meals and have special prayers with the extended family. [8]




National
National festivals include Norouz (Afghan New Year), Victory of the Muslim Nation (28 April), Anniversary of Revolution, Afghan Independence Day (also known as Jeshen) (19 August), and National Labour Day, Remembrance Day for Martyrs and Disabled (4 May). Norouz is held annually on 21 March.




Religious
For more information see:Islamic Holidays

Afghanistan's religious holidays are nearly the same as Islamic holidays. Some of the most important include Eid ul-Fitr, Eid ul-Adha, Ashura, and Mawlid [9] .



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post Sep 9 2006, 01:04 AM
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.......and finally our journey towards the afghan music and our upcoming show





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post Sep 9 2006, 01:06 AM
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and finally our journey towards the afghan music and our upcoming show


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post Sep 9 2006, 01:07 AM
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and finally our journey towards the afghan music and our upcoming show


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post Sep 9 2006, 01:08 AM
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and finally our journey towards the afghan music and our upcoming show


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post Sep 9 2006, 01:10 AM
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"Soroud-e-Melli" (Afghan. for "Hymn of the People") is the national anthem of Afghanistan. It was adopted in 2006, and was officially announced in May, 2006. The Afghan National Anthem is in Pashto language, and according to the Afghanistan Constitution, it includes the tribes names and the words "Allah o Akbar" (God is Great).

Lyrics



[b]By Suliman Masood Watanyar[/b]
دا وطن افغانستان دی دا عزت د هر افغان دی

کور د سولی کور د توری هر بچی یی قهرمان دی

دا وطن د تولو کور دی د بلوچو د ازبکو

د پشتون او هزاره وو د ترکمنو د تاجکو

ورسره عرب، گوجر دی پامیریان، نورستانیان

براهوی دی، قزلباش دی هم ایماق، هم پشه ییان

دا هیواد به تل زلیژی لکه لمر پرشنه آسمان

په سینه کی د آسیا به لکه زره وی جاویدان

نوم د حق مودی رهبر وایو الله اکبر وایو الله اکبر



Transliteration
Daa watan afghanistan di Daa ezzat de har afghan di kor de soli kor de tori har bachi ye qahraman di daa watan di tolo kor di de balocho, de uzbako de pashtoon aw hazarwoo de turkmano de tajeko worsara arab, gojar di pamirian, noristanian barahawi di, qizilbash di ham aimaq, ham pashaiyean daa hiwad ba til zaligi laka limar pa eshna aasman pa sina ki de asia laka zera wi jawidan noom de haq mo di rahbar wayoo Allah o Akbar, wayoo Allah o Akbar


English Translation
This land is Afghanistan It is pride of every Afghan The land of peace, the land of sword Its sons are all braves This is the country of every tribe Land of Baluch, and Uzbeks Pashtoons, and Hazaras Turkman and Tajiks with them, Arabs and Gojars Pamirian, Nooristanian Barahawi, and Qizilbash Also Aimaq, and Pashaye This Land will shine for ever Like the sun in the blue sky In the chest of Asia It will remain as heart for ever We will follow the one God We all say, Allah is great, we all say, Allah is great



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post Sep 9 2006, 10:09 AM
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Khobz! Impressive collection of pix re! Looking forward to more info and your program! Shoot it gurl make it soon!

N smile.gif
ps: Khobz there are pix of ppl with diff musical instruments na? Could you give the names of them. I vaguely recognized one that looks like a dilruba.

here is a sample of that instrument -

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post Sep 9 2006, 10:13 AM
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QUOTE(Nimii @ Sep 8 2006, 10:39 PM) *
Khobz! Impressive collection of pix re! Looking forward to more info and your program! Shoot it gurl make it soon!

N smile.gif




sure sweety.........i'm tryin to make it within two weeks or so..........then i will take u to Afghanistan for free ...n will serve u afghani dish in Kabul , my city wink.gif


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post Sep 9 2006, 10:37 AM
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QUOTE(Nimii @ Sep 8 2006, 10:39 PM) *
Khobz! Impressive collection of pix re! Looking forward to more info and your program! Shoot it gurl make it soon!

N smile.gif
ps: Khobz there are pix of ppl with diff musical instruments na? Could you give the names of them. I vaguely recognized one that looks like a dilruba.

here is a sample of that instrument -

IPB Image




wait a min.........am not sure if it's Richak/Ghichak .........or Sarani..............they both have similar sounds.............so it's either of two............wonder if Kishorda can help here


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post Sep 9 2006, 10:47 AM
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one thing else......in my list of afghan traditional instrumetns...........there's no such picture matching this instrument.........but looking at the thing with which it is played.........it resembles Ghichak



i know this is used in Afghan music...........and as well as India...............this is the instrument played in Umrao jaan songs.............not very sure if it's our tradtional instrument unsure.gif




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post Sep 9 2006, 03:57 PM
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Did some search and found Rabab (a traditional Afghan musical instrument) resembles a guitar (Indian version of it is Sarod) - Sarod more or less looks like the one given in the picture where a solo man is sitting and playing.

Then one more I found was some dohls! unsure.gif

Khobz found this interesting site re ohmy.gif

http://www.afghansite.com/
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post Sep 9 2006, 11:39 PM
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QUOTE(Nimii @ Sep 9 2006, 04:27 AM) *
Did some search and found Rabab (a traditional Afghan musical instrument) resembles a guitar (Indian version of it is Sarod) - Sarod more or less looks like the one given in the picture where a solo man is sitting and playing.

Then one more I found was some dohls! unsure.gif

Khobz found this interesting site re ohmy.gif

http://www.afghansite.com/






ayooooooooooooo dun u bring all instruments here....................sad.gif..........it's part of program to introduce u with afghan musical instruments......BUT.....at the day of program...............aaab ek ek kar ke idhar maaat lana sad.gif.............uuuuuuu Nimi kahe ke sad.gif...


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post Sep 9 2006, 11:46 PM
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Khobi ji, was one of the instruments in those pics "dilruba"?
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