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Dimple
post Jun 14 2007, 04:27 PM
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A stitch in time for Atlantis?

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


HOUSTON: Atlantis astronauts, including Sunita Williams, may use a sewing kit normally reserved for spacesuits to repair the spacecraft's peeled-back thermal blanket, NASA managers said.
The mission was extended on Monday by two days to allow time to fix the blanket, which peeled during launch last week. No final decision has been made on when the repair will be made or what technique will be used.
Engineers are leaning toward using stainless steel wire as thread and an instrument with a rounded end resembling a small darning needle. NASA engineers planned to try out the different method in heat and wind tunnel tests.
The thermal blankets are used to protect the shuttle from searing heat during re-entry.
The rest of the shuttle appeared to be in fine shape, NASA said. Agencies


=============================================================

In this image from NASA-TV, the Earth and the payload bay of the space shuttle Atlantis is shown on Saturday, June 9, 2007. With a 4-inch gap in the space shuttle Atlantis' heat-protecting blanket not appearing to be an urgent problem on Saturday, the crew readied themselves for what NASA called a delicate ballet with the international space station. Then the shuttle will enter a weeklong embrace Sunday with the orbital outpost. (AP Photo/NASA-TV)


(AP) -- With a 4-inch gap in the space shuttle Atlantis' heat-protecting blanket not appearing to be an urgent problem on Saturday, the crew readied themselves for what NASA called a delicate ballet with the international space station.
Then the shuttle will enter a weeklong embrace Sunday with the orbital outpost.

Atlantis' seven astronauts spent much of Saturday on a mandatory inspection of the shuttle's delicate heat tiles, outer edges and blankets for problems similar to the kind that caused the fatal Columbia accident in 2003. As of Saturday afternoon, no glaring problems were reported.

But late Friday and early Saturday, the crew spent extra time using a robot arm to look at a gap in a thermal blanket on the left side of the shuttle. The gap, about 4 inches by 6 inches, appears to have been caused by air lifting the corner of the blanket up, John Shannon, chairman of the mission management team, said at a news conference.

"It's not a great deal of concern right now, but there's a lot of work to be done," Shannon said. "Other than that, the vehicle is very clean."

NASA engineers want to study more photos of the torn blanket, covering maneuvering engines at the tail of the shuttle, particularly images that were taken by cameras attached to the solid rocket boosters that separated from Atlantis more than two minutes into flight and then dropped into the Atlantic Ocean. The boosters are recovered by ships after each launch.

Using the images, engineers can build models and perform aerodynamic and thermodynamic tests to determine whether the lifted blanket would cause problems during Atlantis' re-entry into Earth's atmosphere at the end of the mission.

Engineers also plan to study past shuttle flights.

Thermal blankets came unstitched during flights of Discovery in 2005 and 2006 without any problems, and thermal tiles were lost in the same area where the peeled-up blanket is on Atlantis on two of the earliest shuttle flights.

The area does not get hotter than 1,000 degrees Fahrenheit during the shuttle's return to Earth, compared with other parts of the vehicle where temperatures can get as hot as 2,900 degrees Fahrenheit.

It is not a place where NASA is usually concerned about potentially fatal problems. But if engineers decided it needed to be fixed, Atlantis' astronauts could trim if off, tuck it back into protective tiles or cover it with a plate held in place by adhesive goo during three planned spacewalks or extra one added to the schedule.

After the Columbia disaster, a shuttle repair kit was included in all shuttle missions.

"We have wide spectrum of repair technologies," Shannon said.

As part of the normal day-after-launch tile inspections, astronaut Patrick Forrester used the shuttle's robot arm and a boom extension to examine its wings and outer edges.

Atlantis' crew was given an extra half-hour to sleep Saturday morning, then awoke to the song "Big Boy Toys" by Aaron Tippin.

Atlantis' seven-man crew was closing the gap between it and the space station by about 800 miles every 90-minute orbit. Atlantis is scheduled to dock with the space station Sunday at 3:38 p.m. EDT.

Before the docking comes maneuvering that NASA officials often call a delicate ballet, a procedure that has appeared effortless in 20 previous tries, even though it is risky.

"Two vehicles weighing 230,000 pounds going 17,500 mph, it's tough stuff," Shannon told The Associated Press.

Atlantis commander Rick Sturckow will move the shuttle until it is 600 feet below the station and then make the shuttle turn a 360-degree backflip in just nine minutes. The last few feet of the docking occur so slowly that Atlantis will get only an inch closer to the station every second.

Once the shuttle and station connect, they will stay locked until June 17.

During the 11-day flight, the astronauts will deliver a new segment and a pair of solar panels to the orbiting outpost. They plan three spacewalks - on Monday, Wednesday and Friday - to install the new equipment and retract an old solar panel.

On Sunday, astronaut Clayton Anderson will replace astronaut Sunita Williams as the U.S. representative aboard the space station, and Williams will return to Earth aboard Atlantis. She has spent the past six months in orbit.

The first shuttle launch of the year helped put NASA back on track after a run of bad luck and scandal on the ground during the first half of the year.

In the past few months, NASA has seen the arrest of astronaut Lisa Nowak in an alleged plot to kidnap her rival for a shuttle pilot's affections; a murder-suicide at the Johnson Space Center in Houston; and the derailment of a train carrying rocket-booster segments for future shuttle launches.

More recently, NASA Administrator Michael Griffin has come under fire for suggesting that global warming may not be a problem worth wrestling with. And the agency's inspector general was lambasted at a congressional hearing Thursday by former staff members, congressmen and senators for the way he managed his office, treated his employees and investigated complaints.

---

Associated Press Writer Mike Schneider in Houston contributed to this report.


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Dimple
post Jun 18 2007, 10:01 AM
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Final spacewalk completed, Atlantis set for return flight

Two US astronauts completed the fourth and final spacewalk of the Atlantis mission, setting the stage for the shuttle's return to earth later this week, which will bring home Indian-American Sunita Williams after her six-month sojourn at the International Space Station [Images], a record for a woman.

During the six-hour, 29-minute spacewalk on Sunday, mission specialists Patrick Forrester and Steven Swanson successfully completed all the tasks assigned to them, including the activation of the ISS' new truss segment.

They also installed a new set of solar panels and a shield to protect the station against meteors, besides removing an antenna for satellite navigation.

Attention now turns to the departure of Atlantis, which is slated to undock from the ISS on Tuesday and return to earth on Thursday.

Williams, who on Saturday broke the record for the longest uninterrupted space flight by a woman, will be among the seven-member crew making the flight back.

'Suni', as she is called, came to the station in December in her first space flight. She will be relieved by Clayton Anderson, who came up with Atlantis and will remain on the ISS until October.

However, mission managers may yet decide to add a day of docked operations for the Atlantis crew if the Russian navigation computers do not perform adequately during a test on Monday morning.

The astronauts on Friday fixed the ISS computers after a 48-hour systems breakdown by bypassing a power switch with a jumper cable.

Also, Atlantis' thermal blanket was fixed on Saturday, clearing the way for its return flight to earth after a 13-day mission that was extended by two days due to the damaged thermal protection system.

Undertaking the spacewalk on Sunday, Forrester and Swanson first prepared the Starboard 3 and 4 (S3/S4) truss segment of the ISS, which was installed on June 11.

Most of the work centered on activating the Solar Alpha Rotary Joint, which will allow tracking of the Sun.

They then installed a computer network cable on to the Unity module and removed a Global Positioning System antenna.

The two astronauts also finished the installation of a piece of debris shielding on the Destiny laboratory.

Mission Specialist Jim Reilly coordinated the spacewalk and Pilot Lee Archambault operated the robot arm.




"Shikwa nahin kisise, kisise gila nahin,
Naseeb mein nahin tha jo - humko mila nahin
.."


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Dimple
post Jun 21 2007, 04:47 PM
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Atlantis safe to return despite 'mistake'

June 21, 2007 09:12 IST

NASA [Images] has accepted that it made a mistake in its calculations about a tear in space shuttle Atlantis' heat protection.

But this should not prevent the ship's safe return to earth, the agency added.

Deputy shuttle program manager John Shannon said an area beneath a torn heat-resistant blanket near the shuttle's tail had gotten hotter than the scientists first thought during Atlantis' launch into space on June 8.

While the difference in temperatures was relatively small -- 410 degrees Fahrenheit (210 degrees Celsius) instead of 350 degrees Fahrenheit (177 degrees Celsius) -- and would not have damaged the shuttle, errors involving shuttle heat shields raise eyebrows since the Columbia disaster in 2003.

Despite the error, officials said the shuttle was on course for landing on Thursday at Kennedy Space Center in Florida [Images] if weather permits.

Shannon blamed the error on a faulty assumption about what materials were beneath the inches-long (centimetres) tear. The error was spotted when astronaut Danny Olivas went out to repair the blanket, which protects part of the shuttle from heat when it is in the earth's atmosphere.

Instead of a cushioning layer NASA had expected, there was a graphite material.

Shannon, in a briefing at Johnson Space Center, blamed bad paperwork for the mistake, but said the error posed no threat to Atlantis.

Later, shuttle managers officially deemed the shuttle fit for landing.

Columbia broke apart in 2003 as it came back to Earth because of an undetected break in its heat shield caused by a strike of loose insulation from the fuel tank at launch. Seven astronauts on board were killed.

Landing flight director Norm Knight said NASA hopes to bring Atlantis back to Kennedy Space Center in Florida on Thursday, but the weather forecast is for low clouds and possible nearby thunderstorms, both of which would prevent landing.

''I know the forecast now is no-go, but weather changes,'' Knight said. ''If weather doesn't cooperate we will keep the crew safe and the vehicle safe and go around for another day.'' If Atlantis cannot land today, NASA will consider directing it to Edwards Air Force Base in California on Friday, he said. The shuttle has enough supplies to stay in space until Sunday.

Atlantis was docked to the International Space Station [Images] for nine days, during which the crew installed a new pair solar power panels to generate additional electricity.

The crew conducted four spacewalks to help prepare the $100 billion orbital outpost for the arrival of new laboratories built by Europe and Japan [Images].

A key set of computers on the station crashed for several days but were restored by an improvised rewiring job.

The US space agency plans 12 more construction missions to the space station, which is slightly more than halfway built, before the shuttle fleet is retired in 2010.




"Shikwa nahin kisise, kisise gila nahin,
Naseeb mein nahin tha jo - humko mila nahin
.."


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Reeth
post Jun 27 2007, 03:41 PM
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QUOTE(Dimple @ Jun 14 2007, 04:27 PM) *

A stitch in time for Atlantis?

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


HOUSTON: Atlantis astronauts, including Sunita Williams, may use a sewing kit normally reserved for spacesuits to repair the spacecraft's peeled-back thermal blanket, NASA managers said.
The mission was extended on Monday by two days to allow time to fix the blanket, which peeled during launch last week. No final decision has been made on when the repair will be made or what technique will be used.
Engineers are leaning toward using stainless steel wire as thread and an instrument with a rounded end resembling a small darning needle. NASA engineers planned to try out the different method in heat and wind tunnel tests.
The thermal blankets are used to protect the shuttle from searing heat during re-entry.
The rest of the shuttle appeared to be in fine shape, NASA said. Agencies


=============================================================

In this image from NASA-TV, the Earth and the payload bay of the space shuttle Atlantis is shown on Saturday, June 9, 2007. With a 4-inch gap in the space shuttle Atlantis' heat-protecting blanket not appearing to be an urgent problem on Saturday, the crew readied themselves for what NASA called a delicate ballet with the international space station. Then the shuttle will enter a weeklong embrace Sunday with the orbital outpost. (AP Photo/NASA-TV)


(AP) -- With a 4-inch gap in the space shuttle Atlantis' heat-protecting blanket not appearing to be an urgent problem on Saturday, the crew readied themselves for what NASA called a delicate ballet with the international space station.
Then the shuttle will enter a weeklong embrace Sunday with the orbital outpost.

Atlantis' seven astronauts spent much of Saturday on a mandatory inspection of the shuttle's delicate heat tiles, outer edges and blankets for problems similar to the kind that caused the fatal Columbia accident in 2003. As of Saturday afternoon, no glaring problems were reported.

But late Friday and early Saturday, the crew spent extra time using a robot arm to look at a gap in a thermal blanket on the left side of the shuttle. The gap, about 4 inches by 6 inches, appears to have been caused by air lifting the corner of the blanket up, John Shannon, chairman of the mission management team, said at a news conference.

"It's not a great deal of concern right now, but there's a lot of work to be done," Shannon said. "Other than that, the vehicle is very clean."

NASA engineers want to study more photos of the torn blanket, covering maneuvering engines at the tail of the shuttle, particularly images that were taken by cameras attached to the solid rocket boosters that separated from Atlantis more than two minutes into flight and then dropped into the Atlantic Ocean. The boosters are recovered by ships after each launch.

Using the images, engineers can build models and perform aerodynamic and thermodynamic tests to determine whether the lifted blanket would cause problems during Atlantis' re-entry into Earth's atmosphere at the end of the mission.

Engineers also plan to study past shuttle flights.

Thermal blankets came unstitched during flights of Discovery in 2005 and 2006 without any problems, and thermal tiles were lost in the same area where the peeled-up blanket is on Atlantis on two of the earliest shuttle flights.

The area does not get hotter than 1,000 degrees Fahrenheit during the shuttle's return to Earth, compared with other parts of the vehicle where temperatures can get as hot as 2,900 degrees Fahrenheit.

It is not a place where NASA is usually concerned about potentially fatal problems. But if engineers decided it needed to be fixed, Atlantis' astronauts could trim if off, tuck it back into protective tiles or cover it with a plate held in place by adhesive goo during three planned spacewalks or extra one added to the schedule.

After the Columbia disaster, a shuttle repair kit was included in all shuttle missions.

"We have wide spectrum of repair technologies," Shannon said.

As part of the normal day-after-launch tile inspections, astronaut Patrick Forrester used the shuttle's robot arm and a boom extension to examine its wings and outer edges.

Atlantis' crew was given an extra half-hour to sleep Saturday morning, then awoke to the song "Big Boy Toys" by Aaron Tippin.

Atlantis' seven-man crew was closing the gap between it and the space station by about 800 miles every 90-minute orbit. Atlantis is scheduled to dock with the space station Sunday at 3:38 p.m. EDT.

Before the docking comes maneuvering that NASA officials often call a delicate ballet, a procedure that has appeared effortless in 20 previous tries, even though it is risky.

"Two vehicles weighing 230,000 pounds going 17,500 mph, it's tough stuff," Shannon told The Associated Press.

Atlantis commander Rick Sturckow will move the shuttle until it is 600 feet below the station and then make the shuttle turn a 360-degree backflip in just nine minutes. The last few feet of the docking occur so slowly that Atlantis will get only an inch closer to the station every second.

Once the shuttle and station connect, they will stay locked until June 17.

During the 11-day flight, the astronauts will deliver a new segment and a pair of solar panels to the orbiting outpost. They plan three spacewalks - on Monday, Wednesday and Friday - to install the new equipment and retract an old solar panel.

On Sunday, astronaut Clayton Anderson will replace astronaut Sunita Williams as the U.S. representative aboard the space station, and Williams will return to Earth aboard Atlantis. She has spent the past six months in orbit.

The first shuttle launch of the year helped put NASA back on track after a run of bad luck and scandal on the ground during the first half of the year.

In the past few months, NASA has seen the arrest of astronaut Lisa Nowak in an alleged plot to kidnap her rival for a shuttle pilot's affections; a murder-suicide at the Johnson Space Center in Houston; and the derailment of a train carrying rocket-booster segments for future shuttle launches.

More recently, NASA Administrator Michael Griffin has come under fire for suggesting that global warming may not be a problem worth wrestling with. And the agency's inspector general was lambasted at a congressional hearing Thursday by former staff members, congressmen and senators for the way he managed his office, treated his employees and investigated complaints.

---

Associated Press Writer Mike Schneider in Houston contributed to this report.



QUOTE(Dimple @ Jun 18 2007, 10:01 AM) *

Final spacewalk completed, Atlantis set for return flight

Two US astronauts completed the fourth and final spacewalk of the Atlantis mission, setting the stage for the shuttle's return to earth later this week, which will bring home Indian-American Sunita Williams after her six-month sojourn at the International Space Station [Images], a record for a woman.

During the six-hour, 29-minute spacewalk on Sunday, mission specialists Patrick Forrester and Steven Swanson successfully completed all the tasks assigned to them, including the activation of the ISS' new truss segment.

They also installed a new set of solar panels and a shield to protect the station against meteors, besides removing an antenna for satellite navigation.

Attention now turns to the departure of Atlantis, which is slated to undock from the ISS on Tuesday and return to earth on Thursday.

Williams, who on Saturday broke the record for the longest uninterrupted space flight by a woman, will be among the seven-member crew making the flight back.

'Suni', as she is called, came to the station in December in her first space flight. She will be relieved by Clayton Anderson, who came up with Atlantis and will remain on the ISS until October.

However, mission managers may yet decide to add a day of docked operations for the Atlantis crew if the Russian navigation computers do not perform adequately during a test on Monday morning.

The astronauts on Friday fixed the ISS computers after a 48-hour systems breakdown by bypassing a power switch with a jumper cable.

Also, Atlantis' thermal blanket was fixed on Saturday, clearing the way for its return flight to earth after a 13-day mission that was extended by two days due to the damaged thermal protection system.

Undertaking the spacewalk on Sunday, Forrester and Swanson first prepared the Starboard 3 and 4 (S3/S4) truss segment of the ISS, which was installed on June 11.

Most of the work centered on activating the Solar Alpha Rotary Joint, which will allow tracking of the Sun.

They then installed a computer network cable on to the Unity module and removed a Global Positioning System antenna.

The two astronauts also finished the installation of a piece of debris shielding on the Destiny laboratory.

Mission Specialist Jim Reilly coordinated the spacewalk and Pilot Lee Archambault operated the robot arm.



QUOTE(Dimple @ Jun 21 2007, 04:47 PM) *

Atlantis safe to return despite 'mistake'

June 21, 2007 09:12 IST

NASA [Images] has accepted that it made a mistake in its calculations about a tear in space shuttle Atlantis' heat protection.

But this should not prevent the ship's safe return to earth, the agency added.

Deputy shuttle program manager John Shannon said an area beneath a torn heat-resistant blanket near the shuttle's tail had gotten hotter than the scientists first thought during Atlantis' launch into space on June 8.

While the difference in temperatures was relatively small -- 410 degrees Fahrenheit (210 degrees Celsius) instead of 350 degrees Fahrenheit (177 degrees Celsius) -- and would not have damaged the shuttle, errors involving shuttle heat shields raise eyebrows since the Columbia disaster in 2003.

Despite the error, officials said the shuttle was on course for landing on Thursday at Kennedy Space Center in Florida [Images] if weather permits.

Shannon blamed the error on a faulty assumption about what materials were beneath the inches-long (centimetres) tear. The error was spotted when astronaut Danny Olivas went out to repair the blanket, which protects part of the shuttle from heat when it is in the earth's atmosphere.

Instead of a cushioning layer NASA had expected, there was a graphite material.

Shannon, in a briefing at Johnson Space Center, blamed bad paperwork for the mistake, but said the error posed no threat to Atlantis.

Later, shuttle managers officially deemed the shuttle fit for landing.

Columbia broke apart in 2003 as it came back to Earth because of an undetected break in its heat shield caused by a strike of loose insulation from the fuel tank at launch. Seven astronauts on board were killed.

Landing flight director Norm Knight said NASA hopes to bring Atlantis back to Kennedy Space Center in Florida on Thursday, but the weather forecast is for low clouds and possible nearby thunderstorms, both of which would prevent landing.

''I know the forecast now is no-go, but weather changes,'' Knight said. ''If weather doesn't cooperate we will keep the crew safe and the vehicle safe and go around for another day.'' If Atlantis cannot land today, NASA will consider directing it to Edwards Air Force Base in California on Friday, he said. The shuttle has enough supplies to stay in space until Sunday.

Atlantis was docked to the International Space Station [Images] for nine days, during which the crew installed a new pair solar power panels to generate additional electricity.

The crew conducted four spacewalks to help prepare the $100 billion orbital outpost for the arrival of new laboratories built by Europe and Japan [Images].

A key set of computers on the station crashed for several days but were restored by an improvised rewiring job.

The US space agency plans 12 more construction missions to the space station, which is slightly more than halfway built, before the shuttle fleet is retired in 2010.



All's well that ends well..........Thanks a lot for the detailed posts Dimple smile.gif



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Mandrake
post Jun 27 2007, 04:30 PM
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And just a small thought: why do these guys choose names that do not make a happy sense?
Why Atlantis? - knowing that Atlantis sank/blew up/disappeared without a trace?

Why did they name a so-called-unsinkable ship 'Titanic', knowing that the Titans were always doomed to be destroyed?

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Reeth
post Jun 27 2007, 04:34 PM
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QUOTE(Mandrake @ Jun 27 2007, 04:30 PM) *

And just a small thought: why do these guys choose names that do not make a happy sense?
Why Atlantis? - knowing that Atlantis sank/blew up/disappeared without a trace?

Why did they name a so-called-unsinkable ship 'Titanic', knowing that the Titans were always doomed to be destroyed?

confused.gif food for thought........



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Mandrake
post Jun 27 2007, 09:59 PM
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No one else is eating.. poseur.gif

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noorie
post Jun 27 2007, 11:14 PM
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'coz it is indigestable? tongue1.gif

Noorie

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"You have enemies? Good! It means that you stood up for something, sometime in your life."
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post Jun 28 2007, 07:20 AM
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Yes, kind of biggrin.gif
That also reminds me of the fact that when the Apollo missions were happening, mission 13 was the one that ran into ALL kinds of trouble. And there had always been a case that they skip '13' for obvious reasons, but the idea was shot down.
Incidentally, the re-entry time of Apollo-13 was 13:13, which was changed to 13:14.

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Dimple
post Jun 28 2007, 02:16 PM
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Thanks guys for your comments smile1.gif

Suneeta Williams is back on earth now - what an achievement !

"Shikwa nahin kisise, kisise gila nahin,
Naseeb mein nahin tha jo - humko mila nahin
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